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Odyssey

(4 albums)
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  • Odyssey & We Are The Hunters

    Odyssey & We Are The Hunters

    Bestseller
    There is a few, almost not at all to tell the truth, information on this last find from the Polish label Generator.pl Odyssey & We are the Hunters is an eponym album which contains two long musical pieces with very Berlin School aromas, composed by Odyssey (The Four Elements) and We are the Hunters (Environmental Energy) and produced by Tomasz Pauszek, the man behind Odyssey. We know Odyssey to have been charmed by his fascinating electronic symphony; Music for Subway in 2012. We know on the other hand a little less We are the Hunters, a very discreet, subdued band which does into big ambient vintage Berlin School. The collaboration between both electronic entities could not thus give something uninteresting. And it's exactly what waits for us with this delicious album full of memories of the analog years.
    It's in the ambiospherical precepts dear to the psychedelicosmic structures of the analog years that begins The Four Elements. The water oozes from the walls of a cosmic volcano, where the layers of a morphic synth are floating and boiling in organic tones. Fine sequences dance in their spheroidal shadows, shaping a static dance which spins in these lunar synth layers which make all the beauty of an introduction closer to sound experiments than well ordered structures. Then the silence widens its veil of mystery from the 7th minute, except for silvery gurglings which sparkle such as the lapping of a brook of prisms. This is there that is hatching a fascinating lunar ballad which swirls like an allegorical carousel under solos and cosmic sound effects. The ambience is fascinating and our eardrums are gobbling up this fusion of sounds which give a strange sonic show, whereas the synth is whistling some soft solos which adopt the airs of this melodic ritornello. The ambiences change of skin at around the 16th minute while that The Four Elements starts a beautiful structure of rhythm which undulates passively on good bass pulsations, sober electronic percussions and sequences which flicker in structures of criss-crossed underlying rhythms. Odyssey offers us a strange colorful synth-pop where Jean Michel Jarre's tribal, cosmic and rhythmic influences get mix in the robotics melodies of Kraftwerk. This phase of rhythm amplifies its velocity with a funk approach where the undulations gurgle of organic tones in some ethereal voices and these deep shouts which exhilarate the eardrums since the opening of this strange space-funk. We have already crossed the bar of 23 minutes when the heavy and vibrating pulsations stop and that The Four Elements kisses a phase more melodious, even melancholic, with a soft electric piano which scatters its pensive notes in the discreet chirping of a synth. It's a brief rest of 3 minutes before that some sequences begin to be champing at the bit and before that The Four Elements turns on itself in search of a rhythmic direction. The arpeggios swirl intensely under the cooings of a dreamy synth whereas that a sneaky whirlwind of sequences makes spin the last minutes of The Four Elements. Some bass and crystal clear sequences which get mix and whirl in a superb rhythmic chassé-croisé, laying the lines of a very good circular rhythm a la Jarre that rattling percussions and motionless twistings are surrounding in a cosmic mood from where filter soft solos full of analog fragrances. The first 13 minutes of Environmental Energy are a symphony of organic noises which gurgle in a dense ambiosonic broth where sing twisted lamentations from a synth tinted with the psychedelic perfume of Klaus Schulze's vintage years. Pulsations beat the languor around 13 minutes, bringing Environmental Energy towards a bubbling static movement where the bass sequences pulse and oscillate heavily on a linear movement decorated by sparkling arpeggios among which the ringings, as well as the chthonian airs, will be the only harmonies of this cosmic sound whirlwind which is reminiscent of the late Michael Garrison. Candy for old ears!
    Odyssey & We are the Hunters is a real musical journey in the time of the analog rhythms. It's a more experimental side of the Berlin School style with a subtle zest of French School such as developed by Jean Michel Jarre. If we like these ambient rhythms which hypnotize and seduce due to their sonic pallets, we shall be more than delighted by this surprising album that made me dusted my old albums from Klaus Schulze and Michael Garrison. To be tamed for the greater pleasure of our ears.

    Sylvain Lupari

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 1CD


    8,76 EUR
  • Odyssey | Music for Subway - Symphony for Analogues

    Odyssey | Music for Subway - Symphony for Analogues

    Bestseller

    At the time where digital and software synths are invading the studio recordings and basements of EM composers, the analog gear is quietly resurfacing. Sculptor of sound and musical textures, the Polish synthesist

    Tomasz Pauszek

    decided to pay tribute to the cradle of his influences by composing an album completely conceived analog equipments. Music for Subway (Symphony for Analogues) is a long electronic symphony which lies on 20 paintings divided in 2 acts.

    Odyssey

    plunges the auditor into a surprising sound immersion of a musical universe that has no borders and where the cosmic ambiences embrace some fine rhythms pushed by oscillations with sophisticated curves. Even if the influences of Tomasz Pauszek go from

    Tangerine Dream

    to

    Klaus Schulze

    , while passing by

    Mike Oldfield

    and

    Kitaro

    , Music for Subway (Symphony for Analogues) is drawn from

    Jean Michel Jarre's

    electronic-galactic ponds with all the sound fauna of the Milky Ways painted by

    Vangelis

    . In brief, it's an attractive musical cocktail which lets hear all of its magnificence with a good pair of earphones. After the music for airports and for elevators, here is all the new quintessence in analog electronic art; music for subways.
    Like when we are entering in a subway station, Music for Subway (Symphony for Analogues) displays its ambiences with some dense cosmic waves which pass over the passengers and break out through the banisters of Station1 with a hiccupping rhythm which rolls in loop under suave synth harmonies. You think of being in the lands

    Jean Michel Jarre

    ? You are completely right! The rhythmic approach and the harmonies are terribly near the melodies and the film music of the French cinema. The tempo is charmingly old-fashioned and comes close of the underground paces of Space Art with a synth of which the shrillness breezes forge an electronic melody which sings in our ears with a disconcerting fragility. These strident blizzards rush into Station2 such as howling of Martenot waves which float and roam among the colorful jingles of a cosmic streetcar. Throughout his electronic analog symphony,

    Odyssey

    mixes skillfully the rhythms and ambiences with an attractive and creative melodic approach. Station3 is superb with its ghostly rhythm molded the in amplitudes and reverberations which roll in loops under the jingles of cymbals and spectral breaths in an Aeolian oblivion stuffed of an incredible sound fauna which separates the rhythm of its rhythmic envelope. Mainly statics, the movement offers fine variations which modulate Station3 into a long cosmic delirium. Station 4 offers a heavier pace which pulsates with frenzy into a tunnel decorated with ochre smoke and blue electricity. Station 5 is a sweet symphony that could be likened to a dark melody for the Phantom of Tramway with its tones of organs cooing in the shadows of its harmonies. Station 6 offers a beautiful lunar melody which sings under a bed of arpeggios teeming of an intestine life. After a Station 7 akin to Station 1, Station 8 deploys another beautiful melody finely cut in the echo of the synth loops which sings under the fat impulses of a cosmic train rolling into some intergalactic disturbances. The fine melodies moulded into French melancholies are following one another on this first CD which concludes with two serenades to odors of spiritual virginity.
    Disc 2 opens by a threatening approach with layers of organ tones which stack in a cosmic universe, paving the path to the very nice Station 12 and its lively rhythm a'la Oxygene of which the sound effects are papering its background. After the floating and strident Station 13 and Station 14, Station15 gives a fine oscillatory rhythm which undulate among crystalline arpeggios dancing in parallel of a pace which spreads its heavenly harmonies into the structures of Station 16, one of the good tracks from Music for Subway (Symphony for Analogues). This CD 2 is a bit more ambient with short titles more cosmic than rhythmic, like on Station 17 and Station 18 where

    Jarre's

    moods flood our ears with a cosmic poetry which is good to hear again. Even the rhythms are embedded in these dreamy moods, much like the rotary motion of Station 19 which cannot get rid of a linear stranglehold to interstellar ornaments. Station 20 concludes this symphony of analog sonic textures with an abstract pace that some fine celestial harmonies are turning into a role as much obscure as absent.
    We cannot like Music for Subway (Symphony for Analogues) which is an enchanting album build around the influences of an artist who literally propelled the cosmic music out of orbit. One would believe to hear

    Jean Michel Jarre

    in every corner of this latest opus from Odyssey which is a pleasant lunar symphony with a multitude of delicate rhythms which take refuge in the tranquility of the Mare Tranquillitatis. It's superbly beautiful and poetic. One has always this feeling of floating between two worlds which, if they are not to wear feet, are to wear ears.

    Sylvain Lupari - gutsofdarkness.com & synth&sequences.com



    CD1
    Out of the darkness, there comes our subway - now we can join the sound-journey through underground labyrinths. At about the second-minute-mark pure environmental sounds turn into a splendid sequential composition containing many Oxygene - and Equinoxe - like sound effects. Pay attention to the spicy and fantastically produced rhythm-line - well, it really could be a piece conceived by

    Wolfram Spyra

    ...
    This enjoyable introduction flows into the aerodynamic ambience of the second track. Those who are in love with sequential electronica will indeed be fond of the static, cloudy chord accompanying the leading synths. Soon a thunderstorm is coming - with the 3rd minute mark the sweeps and washes of strong wind seem to want to blow the speakers! The third track is an ingenious, nostalgic tale one might associate with

    Electric Light Orchestra's

    Another Heart Breaks - just listen to these echoes and light traces in an endless electronic tunnel! Here we also get a nice Berlin-fashioned solo. Every now and then, one thought comes to mind: it's pretty hard to name the best track in the whole set, since already the very first notes of each impression are truly magic, deep and dreamy in a very special way. Now we may enjoy the fourth piece; what we are dealing with here are mainly "laser-harp" sequences, the whole piece sounds as if it was played on invisible, hard-to-catch neon zigzags. Truly hypnotic, strong ten minutes.
    The next track is somewhat close to the early works of

    Marek Bilinski

    . All important ingredients are there: high-places moods, pitch changes, melodic and yet very original tunes joining each other in electronic cascades. After only three minutes of this amazing mood there appear the polyphonic structures of a sequential concerto for a rainy day. The seventh piece covers suddenly the arpeggios of the former track with majestic chords; soon there joins in a groovy rhythm and a nice solo. The eighth track pulses with a bass - almost "motor-bass" - rhythm sequence; now our wagons slide through tunnel-labyrinths at a tremendous speed and the only thing accompanying our journey is the jarring light of spectacularly stereophonic sequencers! The final piece of the first CD once more conjures up some

    Jean-Michel Jarre

    -like atmospheres, but the nicely chromatic synth-solo and a swooshy percussion line give some new quality to it. As a whole, this piece also reminds the Listener of a marvellous Time-longplay by the

    Electric Light Orchestra

    .

    CD2
    The first track is a majestic tale that is being painted on cold-chord canvas. Not even four minutes have passed and there appear some beats - marking the entrance of the second piece - accompanied with a lively sequential structure, forming an interesting contrast to the quiet chords.
    The third composition is probably the most abstract one in the whole set; among endless dreamy clouds we suddenly see fluorescent sea-horses and match-stroke-chains - or perhaps it's only a cognitive illusion?... How long has this journey already taken, where are we at all? As if awoken from a strange dream, we take an entirely astonished look at our surroundings. Because of the truly "arctic" atmosphere of the fourth piece we can easily imagine that we are entering a numb endless tunnel built from ice and snow - this track is an utmost beautiful 3-minute ambient composition.
    Our fifth station is a polyphonic arpeggiator construction, now and then flashing about with its blue ounces of electric light. As soon as we enter the sixth piece, our wagons begin to move faster and faster, once more through a creepy snow-ice-tunnel, but now everything's filled up with life, everything is moving, flashing, endless lights are being reflected and distorted... Along with the seventh track the wagons slow down, it seems that we have ceased to move forward at all - or perhaps we have just started a motionless dream? Once more we don't have the slightest idea where we are and how long we have been travelling, and still this hasn't a bit of an uneasy feeling to it!
    The eighth track captures us with its fragile crunchy sounds - we are moving through navy-blue pipeline-labyrinths. Thanks to the chilling atmosphere of the ninth piece we may find ourselves in the real world again. With a groovy sequence in the background we begin to recognize faces of all the passengers, there is nothing alien behind the wagon windows, everything sounds earthly again.
    We are leaving on the tenth station. The echo of the corridor amplifies the sound of our footsteps, chilly chords are calling to each other somewhere near, the world awakes, even the first rays of the rising sun are already there, chasing us out of the subway tunnel. The staircase of the mid-tempo sequence carry us out back to the ground level. It has been an amazing journey indeed...

    Igor Wroblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 2CD


    7,98 EUR
  • Odyssey, Remote Spaces | Ypsilon Project

    Odyssey, Remote Spaces | Ypsilon Project

    Bestseller Good price

    Ypsilon Project is born out of a studio session held in

    Odyssey's

    studio on September 2002 with

    Remote Space

    . Together they melted their influences and styles in a musical union which joined the recollections of the 80's. Making it

    Tomasz Pauszek

    ,

    Konrad Jakrzewski

    and

    Krysztof Rzeznicki

    signed an album with rhythms as varied as styles. From

    Kraftwerk

    to

    Jean Michel Jarre

    en passing by

    Robert Schroeder

    and

    Double Fantasy

    , Ypsilon Project is the meeting point of a period of transition in EM.
    A threadlike cosmic furrow comes down from the deep end of the galaxy to cross its harmonies with a splendid guitar that a synth molds poignant heart-rending solos. A very beautiful smoothing track, In-Thro-Duction introduces us to Ypsilon with an astral tenderness where our dreams float on guitar solos which go adrift in a cosmos filled with stars and celestial bodies which furrow and shine with their musical irradiations. Sequence Space is shaming us out of our soft morphic torpor with fine droplets falling trough their echoes. A suave and warm rhythm is settling down and livens up Sequence Space which moves like a down tempo, but more spatial with beautiful electronic tonalities which wrap a pace becoming more caustic. A soft moon-tempo anchored on a sequential line with delicate pulsations of bass of which notes skip among sequences and more fluid keyboard keys. A track strongly tinted of cosmic fragrances and which reminds me

    Double Fantasy's

    musical universe, Sequence Space is flied over by beautiful twisted synth solos and nice mellotron mist. Percussions pound the opening of Busy City, a track that could easily compares to

    Kraftwerk

    techno style. The rhythm is crystal clear and unfolds pleasantly on jerky synth layers of which the repetition molds a still surge. A strong electro techno track, Busy City unravels its 8 minutes with a steady rhythm and a pulsating frenzy where a variance in the percussions and frenzied pulsations assures a rhythmic which kicks down the shed on a long movement of which the melodious approach varies without ever losing its very electronic cachet, quite as the boiling and furious Morning Rush which is more contemporary and who soaks in an array of heterogeneous electronic tones. Ypsilon's intro is melting with the finale of Morning Rush and offers a more suave tempo, with fine subtleties in the movement, a little as on Sequence Space but with more firmness in the beat.
    Experience sticks Ypsilon with crystalline arpeggios which collide on a sequence to resonant undulations. While we expect an explosive rhythm, Experience takes quite another form with a heavy rhythm certainly, but imprinted by a nice musicality. A kind of techno based on minimalism arpeggios which roll on dichotomous percussions and of which all the rhythm aspect is wrapped with dense synths layers. Synths which sing and charm while freeing nice warbling solos. It's one of the very good track on Ypsilon. With Ambiente we approach the ambient part of Ypsilon. A complex track segmented in several movements, the intro is a slow cosmic waltz where synths strata are multiplying by borrowing contrasting sonorities on a slender sidewinder sounds structure. Abrasive strata which are melting themselves on others with more cocoon-like sounding to form a strange lunar dance and which borrow a superb musical corridor where soft mesmerizing percussions light an odd hypnotic tempo. A real electronic dance which is not without recalling the caustic universes of the first

    Schulze's

    works, Ambiente evolves with such unpredictability as every development charms the listener. A wonderful track with synths as wheedling as charismatic which feed an outstanding lunar procession that sidewinder sounds effects come, here and there, to add more strangeness to this sublime track. It's a real one for real fans of evolutive ambient EM. Halfway between the ambient sweetness of Ambiente and the shy rhythms of Sequence Space, Current Drive evolves on a slow, but constant, rhythmic progression where percussions play a dominating role in its hybrid structure. The more Current Drive moves on the more its tempo espouses a tribal approach with a jerky rhythm where percussions shape a kind of aboriginal tom-toms coming of an unknown planet, whereas keyboards polish a fascinating outer space melody and that synths wrap the structure of long resonant and twisted strips. Current Drive is yet another very strong track on Ypsilon where styles are leaking away in the creative originality of the Polish trio. Acti-Vate concludes on a hectic rhythmic which dances on beautiful synth surges. It's a kind of techno a'la

    Kraftwerk

    way that shows the extreme diversity of

    Tomasz Pauszek

    ,

    Konrad Jakrzewski

    and

    Krysztof Rzeznicki

    .
    Curt and frenzied rhythms, other more suave and hypnotic, which go alongside to some ambient and morphic structures variety of Ypsilon is its biggest wealth. Ypsilon is this kind of album where the musicality and variety can reach and please a wider audience without sacrificing the musical research.
    It's a very nice album that can easily split two styles in the same desire to tame music and so to bring down many presumptuous barriers.

    Sylvain Lupari gutsofdarkness.com & synth&sequences.com



    The music on this album is made by

    Tomasz Pauszek

    (aka

    Odyssey

    ) and the duo

    Konrad Jakrzewski

    &

    Krysztof Rzeznicki

    (aka

    Remote Spaces

    ), of which I heard more years in the previous years. The outcome which makes up Ypsilon Project was composed during live sessions by the three musicians in September 2002. The 76-minutes of music has a vibrant and warm flavour. Its overall atmosphere more or less hails back to the electronic music made at the start of the '80’s when technology slowly but surely stepped in bit by bit. Just have a listen to the smooth and relaxed mood created on the 12-minute Sequence Space, followed by the dynamic electronic rock-pop and up-tempo sequencing of Busy City to get a picture of what the albums music is all about.
    All in all, Ypsilon Project is somewhat of a cross-over of

    Jarre

    ,

    Kraftwerk

    and even

    Tangerine Dream

    .
    Nicely done, guys!

    Bert Strolenberg sonicimmersion.org



    The journey begins somewhat in the mood of a radio-program a'la Radioactivity by

    Kraftwerk

    , soon there appear optimistic notes played on a slightly distorted guitar (or conjured up from a synthesizer?), and, after a while, some boiling chord-clouds fade out and the Listener is home alone with a mere ostinato in a slow pace, which marks the beginning of track two. Are we just taking a long walk through a japanese garden-labyrinth, are these slowly falling white spots snowflakes or tiny flowers? This quiet impression definitely has something to it which reminds me of the music presented by

    Double Fantasy

    (today:

    Food 4 Fantasy

    ) on their album Universal Avenue; the same organic cleanness, which one may associate with empty cosmic space as well as with familiar earthly landscapes. This piece of music is 12 minutes of a solid lounge-trip into the exotic Unknown. Track three is quite a contrast to its predecessor: you immediately hear neonlights, city lights, vehicle lights and neverending car-loops. Welcome to the most modern city at steelgray dawn or in the navyblue evening... In track four, it sounds like

    Harald Grosskopf

    or the

    Kraftwerk

    musicians from the Tour de France Soundtracks era were invited to the session - this is what one should call "aerodynamic music". We are here just a step away not only from sequential electronica or "jarre'ing" elpop, but also from modern remixing moods. In the quicksilver-lively fifth track we hear a solo sounding exactly as if it were conceived on PPG Wave 2 – warm regards from

    Jarre

    or

    Double Fantasy

    (or

    Paul Nagle's

    Lore)! The most traditional piece is probably track six, where

    Odyssey

    vs.

    Remote Spaces

    combine Berlin-like sequences and some JMJ-like moods. The Listener may now enjoy digital clouds approaching just a few inches above her head, the clouds change their forms and colours ceaselessly... The next two pieces are fairly long, more complex, more difficult to classify. Various styles intermingle with each other, the arrangements seem to have been taken out of an electronic dream vault. Both compositions could be musical narrations about snowy parks at night – the first short novel is rather nostalgic, the other one rather murky - pay attention to this ingenuous tabla-loop in the background of track eight! As we all know, all good things move toward their end, and there it is - the final track, groovy elpop slightly in the mood of (once more)

    Double Fantasy

    or

    Jarre

    , but also

    Marek Bilinski

    or

    Tangerine Dream's

    film music in the eighties. In this track we hear a fresh breeze of ostinato-vocoderian "retro-sounds". All in all, Ypsilon Project is a well-produced, multilayered album, which contains 'many happy returns' to legendary electronic moods as well as some surprising arrangements and new formal ideas.

    Igor Wróblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 1CD


    7,64 EUR
  • Odyssey | X - Space Odyssey

    Odyssey | X - Space Odyssey

    Bestseller

    A further multidimensional work by Tomasz Pauszek a.k.a. Odyssey: This album is a convincing mixture of "fine-tuned" sequential electronics, organic ambient music and dynamic electronic rock-pop based on ingenuously programmed percussive patterns.
    Space Overture leads the Listener immediately into some other world, world filled with a cosmic scent of freshly charged batteries - while Between Worlds with its dynamic rhythm-sequences allows the Listener to balance on the edge of the well-known world and some other totally different one, paved with light-blue anti-gravitational stepping stones. One of the most fascinating pieces in the set is doubtless Silver Q, a very dynamic and still very subtle one, with "hidden" percussion pads, rather thought-of than really present. The most important factor of this composition are floating chords "smeared" in the background and some further washes and sweeps; this impression definitely has something in the mood of Klaus Schulze's murky numbness in Silent Running (Trancefer, 1981). The next track, The Deep, also consists basically in skillful conjuring-up of Schulzean moods and harmonies, this time rather in the mood of The Beat Planante (Inter*face, 1985), whereas smeared chill-out chords are not as important as the title "depth", got into with a little help from percussive marks, vocoder pads and echoing chord waves mixed together in one go. Stellar Blue is a conclusion of a bigger whole, drifting yet further in the direction of frosty abstract ambience, and still perfectly shaped and divided in clear rhythmic phrases. Bringing the Light breaks the journey into the abyss of oblivion and marks a sudden change of mood: there it comes, a shiny ostinato slightly touched by nice phasing of a Timewind, with a melancholic keyboard melody a'la JMJ's Oxygene or Les Chants Magnetiques wrought into it. Zenithal is a further break in telling cosmic stories: we are getting closer to IDM and rhythmic laptop ambience than to typical Berlin-inspired electronica. I.O. and Lunar Sky are splendid el-pop pieces in two different moods: the first one is very lively, dynamic and groovy, whilst the other one is very relaxing, soothing and almost ethereal: cloudy soundscaped passing slowly across the evening sky. And then - time for a dessert: two homages to Jean Michel Jarre. Planet B definitely has something in common with experiments presented on Printemps du Bourges, whereas Oxygeum, as its title already suggests, brings a handful of nostalgic ostinatos and melodies skillfully styled-up to resemble characteristic PPG Wave 2-sounds - well, this is how Oxygene 14 or Equinoxe 9 would have sounded like! Odyssey has prepared 120 minutes of enthralling music, which is jolly hard to be classified insofar as the elements of sequential electronica, el-pop, chill-out and ambient music get melanged in one interesting whole, and what joy, there are almost no pauses between the tracks, so that there is "automatically" more atmosphere and depth, more time to contemplate. A musical journey definitely worth being taken.

    Igor Wróblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 2CD


    8,76 EUR