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  • Przemysław Rudź | Cosmological Tales

    Przemysław Rudź | Cosmological Tales

    Bestseller

    It's with a full blast from a metallic synth Through the Planck Era opens.
    These are shots across the bows that strike, making us jump, among which synth resonances and residues spread their tones over fine twinkling notes, paving the way to strong twisted solos of synth which roar in a powerful electronic atmosphere. After this deafening intro, Through the Planck Era floats between two zones of rhythms with multidirectional chords sequences which mold a serrated pace. An ambivalent rhythm with slow synth sparkle which wave under fine twinkling of glass, trapped of heavy pads of a foggy mellotron. Inside its8 minutes, Through the Planck Era reveals the musical duality that reigns towards the 6 tracks of Cosmological Tales. If

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    had seduced and gained the charm of new fans with

    Summa Technologiae

    , this 2nd opus risks to disappoint them because the musical approach of the Polish synthesist is different and transcends the zones of comfort of music to thousand possibilities.
    The God Particle's Dance is the kind of musical piece which hangs instinctively the hearing. A beautiful track which has all the elements to please and which begins with a mellotron waltz of which foggy pads float lasciviously with a set back soft synth whistling its melancholic air. A soft oniric intro disrupted by a sequential line with chords that skip and hiccup with good percussion strikes which hammer a pace silkily wrapped in a mellotron mist. Synth solos fuse and get entangled around sequences coupled to limpid keyboard keys, creating a cozy bed of twinkling arpeggios caught in a mellotron mist. Let There Be Light presents the first atmospheric and atonal moments of Cosmological Tales with unusual synth tones which collide in a cosmos perfumed of dark hooting and whooshing pulsations which pulse among chain of fine crystal clear tones scrolling eclectic snigger. A curious psychedelic-electronic world which slowly takes a more musical shape when latent synth waves wrap this heterogeneous introduction to make it waltz in a cosmic oblivion from where appears a delicate sequential movement with doubled chords. Chords which waddle in a zigzag hunted by reverberations and synth serpentines, before acting alone in an ephemeral tranquility rushed by heavy synth strata with edgy orchestrations. Let There Be Light espouses then a rhythmic structure which skips such as street gangs' allures in an environment punctuated with sequences which tinkle among suave solos of synth.
    Islands of the Universe is an intense cosmic ballet that will end as it begun. A long track, more atmospheric than atonic, which presents us another facet of

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    . The intro plunges us into a musical universe submerged by strange breezes and reverberations of a cosmic tribal world. Rumblings of galactic thunders and shooting streaks accompany this mixture of tribal elements, reflecting the universe of magmatic fusion of Jarre on Les Chants Magnétiques. This atmospheric intro makes room to a more melodious segment where strata of a hatched synth waltz such as pleasant snowflakes, reminding the fabulous structure of Snowflakes are Dancing. These synth strata dances with soft notes of a solitary piano before being melt in vast synth breath which recovers the middle of Islands of the Universe by a somber abyssal coat. A cold silvered sequence a'la Stuntman from

    Edgar Froese

    is coming out of it. She waves and pulses under a rain of cosmic streaks, embracing Frédéric Mercier's analog and oniric universe in Songs from France, while another short-lived sequence is joining to strum brief fast flows, before Islands of the Universe dives back into the tribal and morphic approach of its intro. Always in ambient and melodious mode, We Live Here presents us a magnificent ode to melancholic with a magnificent piano which spreads its solicitude a pouring rain and thunders being serve as its companion. Very beautiful and sensitive, it is the kind of music that melts the ice around the misled souls. Disputable Future encloses this 2nd album of

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    with a more rock approach where nervous and feverish sequences are joined by unbridled percussions and where the synth with stormy undulations and twisted solos is supported by a heavy rock guitar. A heavy and powerful track which doubtless tries to rally fans a bit confused whom had discovered a more rhythmical and melodious

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    on Summa Technologiae.
    Although very different from Summa Technologiae, I quite liked the musical adventure of Cosmological Tales. I discovered there a musician who, without denying his influences, goes out of his comfort zone to offer an album where rhythms still heavy are mixing quite well with atmospheres as poetic as oniric. Cosmological Tales is an album divided well between rhythms and atmospheres with all the power and the sweetness which livens up these two paradoxes which live pretty well on this

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    2nd effort.




    With Cosmocological Tales, Polish synthesist

    Przemysław Rudz

    present us his second album, a recording graced with a fresh, melodic, vibrant and well-produced sound.
    The cd fires off with a fine combination of well-tempered sequencers and rhythms building a bridge with pads of warm digital and analogue sound, with some infectious solos served on top. The third track Let there be Light, clocking at 14 minutes, though sets off in an experimental vein, but fortunately the music starts to slowly shift to more harmonious output later on, although it doesn’t get near the sweeping impact of the previous pieces. The 20-minute Islands of the Universe also has a long atmospheric intro-section before a hypnotizing, minimal sequencer patterns and effects keep spiralling up and down. After a break with a kind of cosmic blasts and sonic whirls the music seeks its way out with a mesmerizing sequencer motif.
    On We Live Here. Mr

    Rudz

    takes the moody, reflective alley with piano, thunder and rain sounds, all making up a fine interlude in which a classic touch is present. The disc rounds out with the up-tempo Disputable Future, which sees one Jarek Figura join Przemysław on e-guitar. After an alienating opening, catchy polyphonic sequencing, drums and analogue synth pads come in, soon followed by energetic guitar solos.
    All in all, this album blends the contemporary sound with analogue vibes, but at the same time also turns things inside out and takes it in a different direction. Unfortunately, the second half of the cd also suffers from the expansive sections where the musician seems to be just dabbling around, forgetting he should be moving forward to keep it interesting.

    Bert Strolenberg



    Following down the path of only bringing you what we consider to be the finest of the new Synth Music CD releases from around the world, here is another that fits that category well.

    Przemslaw Rudz

    is a Polish synth musician heavily influenced by the uniform synth lead melodic and rhythmic styles of

    Jean Michel Jarre

    and

    Klaus Schulze

    , plus there are some hints at

    Tangerine Dream

    in there too, but it's all from the 70's/80's periods of these musician's career. The

    Rudz

    sound is very powerful and forthright, using a lot of Mini-Moog sounds for this lead work. There are a lot of splashes of raw industrial synth power within this music with some of the Mini-Moog works, at times, being almost Wakeman-esque in construction. The opening track: Through The Planck Era is a perfect example of this, as the Moog melodies compete with heavy rhythms and the strong swishes and swooshes of the other synth textures - a strong opener for the album that makes you sit up and listen.
    God Particle's Dance has another fast-ish, infectious Jarre style melody-line with electronic rhythms & percussion set over a strong bed of string synths and other keyboard effects. Let There Be Light opens with the first abstract passage on the album in a setting of tinkling and warbling synth sound patterns and textures, until it starts to take off on a bank of emerging deep and sweeping space-synth textures, with the insect-like life-forms circling above. Later, a deep sequencer rhythm (very TD-like) emerges through the electronic mist and meanders around for a bit until a striking electro rhythm kicks in. Busts of occasional "big" synth orchestra sampled stabs that sound not unlike those used on the Yes track: Owner Of A Lonely Heart, punctuate the rhythmic forces, then a soaring synth melody-line soars in and guides us on a trip through a nebula of spacey sounds and a vibrant rhythmic flow that has the feel of

    Schulze

    in rhythmic overdrive, before eventually fading over the horizon with only a small synth ion trail left behind. Islands Of The Universe starts out in what sounds like the dark lands of the Australian outback, with deep, staggered synth textures creating that feeling of a vast and hostile open landscape, and as it develops, it eventually opens out into a mix of repetitive electronic rhythms and simple melodic motifs that form a Jarre-like section where swooping and swirling synth winds and spiralling effects coupled with sequencer patterns forms an extend passage that never really takes off as you expect it might, then fades back to more of the dark atmospheric landscapes of the opening sequence.
    Rainclouds gather and thunder rolls in for: We Live Here which is a piano piece that is ravaged by periodic loud claps of thunder and a constant downpour of rain, and although the description probably doesn't do it any favours, the track does work really well as it flows through a series of high and low moods.
    The closing track: Disputable Future features the electric guitar sounds of Jarek Figura, and after a cavernous, alien-like opening passage, the sequencer and Jarre-like synth sounds enter and strike up a vibrant driving backbeat that, with added percussion, becomes a real flowing, rhythmic piece of "EM", but when the guitar takes up the lead over a sea of string and other synthesizers, the track really takes of and goes orbital, bringing the album to a dramatic and high-flying close. Overall, for a CD released in 2010 this album has an "analogue" feel and sounds like it was made for the mid-70's - mid 80's. It's quite inventive at times and although the major influences are there you get the feeling that

    Rudz

    is certainly putting his own take on the scene, mixing melody (great Moog solos) with vibrant rhythmic ideas and powerful atmospherics is equal quantities - Nice one!

    CD Services team



    This is already a second

    Przemyslaw Rudz's

    release by Generator.pl - a 70 minute portion of pretty good sequential electronica and ambitious elpop synthesis. On this record, you may find moods corresponding to music made by

    Under The Dome

    ,

    AirSculpture

    and

    Jean-Michel Jarre

    or

    Vangelis

    as well. The opener is a 8 minute long synthesis of funky glittering sounds a la Stuntman by

    Edgar Froese

    and Manikin Records - or Neu Harmony-like groove fantasies. The first "true hit" is the second piece, the shortest one on the CD, in which

    Rudz

    continues the tradition he explored on his earlier successful Generator-CD. What we are dealing here with is, first of all, a catchy melody and a rocky rhythm-pattern in the background; the whole sounds as if it were arranged and played by some early

    Marek Bilinski

    , who is in the mood for The Other Side of the World - here they are, these wonderful "jarre'ing" sounds and thick clouds of melancholic chords, so sunny and yet so icy at the same time indeed. The third impression grows up on the field of abstract noises and washes, then there appears a dynamic, fluorescent ostinato-percussive line; you may dream away for some 14 minutes and then the piece is suddenly over. The main dish is beyond any doubt the track no. 4 with its 20+ minutes;

    Rudz

    is playing with traditional sequential patterns a la

    Manuel Goettsching

    , his furious polyphonic impression could fit very well in the most dynamic sections of the film Koyaanisqatsi. Track 5 is the most quiet and reflexive one in the whole set; you may enjoy some warm piano sounds intermingling with an environmental rain-soundtrack and occasionally recurring thunderstorm voices.

    Rudz

    conjures up an atmospheric track a la

    Detlef Keller's

    The Story of the Clouds, well, you may also think about

    Marek Bilinski's

    Reflections for a while. The last composition is an optimistic, upbeat piece somewhat resembling

    Tangerine Dream's Melrose sessions; first of all, there is this very guitar-solo and a nice touch of polyphonic sequencing in the background. All in all, Cosmological Tales is a very interesting album, consisting of classic, modern and daring electronica. One should really pay attention to very professional multi-track arrangements. Have a nice cosmic trip... round and round, again and again...

    Igor Wróblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 1CD


    11,01 EUR
  • Yarek, Friends | Spirits of the Dust

    Yarek, Friends | Spirits of the Dust

    Bestseller Good price

    Yarek (Jarosław Degórski) is a well-known composer and performer in the electronic music metier; the Generator.pl label released already two albums signed by this artist: Noc na zamku (A Night at the Castle) and Organix. This time Yarek decided to dust off his oldest electronic pieces, rearrange them completely and (re)record them with a little help from his friends. The introduction is a pretty tough try-out: classic electronic sounds intermingle with solid rock guitar-riffs, so that we are dealing here not only with fantastic moods as if taken from the craziest Redshift dream, but also with some industrial spice to it! The second piece is a quieter one; still, it's not just dreamy ambience in a major key, but a wonderfully swinging dialogue between soft keyboards and an improvising guitar - it would have been a "top hit" on Future of the Past or Invisible Fields, had Yarek been invited to Wolfram Spyra's jam-sessions... This track is a brilliant melange of nostalgia, gloominess and some tricky sense of humour and remains so far my favourite piece in the whole set. The third impression is one of the biggest surprises as far as this album is concerned: aggressive beats, guitar sounds even harsher and harder, and, last but not least, there comes this female voice in the oriental manner (plus some additional ethno-elements)... Believe it or not, I couldn't help but think about Crossfire by Die Krupps (!!!), so what we are dealing here with is a definitely daring CD, how far from typical sequential EM moods, but still, how cool! In the fourth track, the ethno taste gets still more exposed, whereas the background gets rather traditional, exit harsh guitars. The fifth piece is a fantastic sequential block in a mid-tempo; while in the background you can hear shiny, ashy patterns of sequential snowflakes, the leading tune is sung by several female voices, once again oriental-tuned. This impression has very much in common with some of the moods conjured up and explored by Klaus Schulze on his newest releases (Contemporary Works II, Moonlake, Kontinuum) and is indeed that great! Track #6 is quite surprising, this time Yarek combined classic electronica, upbeat ambient a la Autechre or Fanger & Siebert and a bit of acid - with some female voice ornaments sprinkled over it, at first once more in the "new schulzean" mood, then turning into something a bit like wordless paraphrases of Blue Fiction's catchy tunes. In the seventh track there appear once more some distorted guitars, this time they become background for an unconventionally arranged "theatre soundtrack", though. The next piece is probably the most "conservative" one in the set - this composition really does sound like Tangerine Dream's film music in the early eighties - but even here there is enough room for the overall spookiness and gloominess. The final track is a quite optimistic (which is not the same as "quite mellow", however...) electronic hymn with further schulzean chants and additional moody synth-figures every now and then. The music gets prouder, sharper... and all of a sudden, it just fades out, comes to an end. It turns to be such a short album - or does it only seem to be so? Be it as it may, this CD is a brilliant puzzle of moods, inviting you to take the astounding journey once more and then once more, you may be sure that there are even more wonders to be found and explored...

    Igor Wróblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 1CD


    7,64 EUR
  • Przemysław Rudź | Summa Technologiae

    Przemysław Rudź | Summa Technologiae

    Bestseller
    What strikes the most when we are listening

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    is the richness of an analogue sonority which caress the electronic beauties of

    Jean Michel Jarre

    as well as beautiful artworks which decorate the eye while the music cares about ears. Another nice discovery from the Polish label, Generator.pl.

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    is a Polish synthsist h2ly inspired by the French School style (

    Jean Michel Jarre

    ,

    Space Art and Thierry Fervant

    ), but with an even more progressive approach and, by moments, a more rock one. This gives a multi-dimensional album, where soft melodies travel through a strange sound fauna tinted by heterogeneous tones. In fact, Przemyslaw's first opus

    Summa Technologiae

    is a beautiful sound adventure where the cosmos is the front door of a fascinating musical world.
    Dilemmas begins by a rather eclectic intro. Varied tones compose a sound fauna of the most eclectic where everything is forming and hearing through strange felted pulsations, threadlike reverberating serpentines, hoops and chinking which are colliding and floating in a cold cosmic atmosphere, while a sequence with curt and hatched chords pound an odd rhythm which zigzags beneath this thick cloud of colorful tones. In spite of this staggering sequential frenzy, Dilemmas is in static mode and boils up in a dark cosmos where a linear sequence hiccups beneath a sky streaked by brief synth solos, crystalline arpeggios, intriguing dark breaths and crystal clear keyboard keys which sculpture momentary harmonies. A musical world of contradiction which embraces a new tangent in the 8'th minute whilst another sequential line, a bit lower while being also heavier, give a second breath to the static broth that is Dilemmas. A sequential line with chords which caw and which is held by sober hits of percussions and keyboard keys while a discreet mellotron synth amplifies this rise of cosmic adrenalin around sound prisms which sparkle and wave in loops. And quietly, Dilemmas fades in time with a soft mellotron mist which turns off the last breaths of a rich and diversified analog life. Two Evolutions is what compares the most with the musical universe of French School EM. An ascending and threatening sequence a'la

    Jarre

    evolves in it beneath strange electronic vocalizes which remind Clara Mondshine's schizophrenia. Two parallel musical universes which are harmonizing beneath the somber layers of a synth with superb swaying and cosmic waves of which harmonies sparkle artlessly before the rhythm explodes with good percussions, throwing Two Evolutions towards a more rock tendency.
    The edgy and steady rhythm of Two Evolutions is constantly illuminated with beautiful synth passages which recall strangely

    Thierry Fervant's

    musical world while the rhythmic flickers under the fragrances of

    Space Art

    , in particular with the crystalline chords which hammer and are subdividing to stir nervously at the end of the road. This is a very good Revival French School EM that ends in a foggy mellotron, introducing the ambient and floating world of

    Space Civilizations

    . Heavy sequences bubble nervously on Intellectronics, propelling us in an aggressive world of sequenced turbulence where sequences pulse, are intersecting into wavy cascades and flicker fervently around synth striations which glance through and scatter with crash and acuteness on a title as boiling as motionless.
    After this enormous sounds storm, Prolegomena To Omnipotence brings us in a shelter under cover with a soft and oniric track where eclectic tones glance through this soft electronic procession. Haughtiness, Phantomology is the cornerstone of Summa Technologiae. A soft intro, very celestial in fact, charms our ears with a synth filled of layers that waltz and are entwining languishingly in a warm cosmos. Fine arpeggios sparkle at around the 4th minute, making resounds their echoes in a quixotic cave crossed by heavy dark winds while a first sequential movement livens up the serenity of Phantomology. A sequential line which staggers to bind itself to slightly metallic percussions which drum delicately under heavy spectral winds. Towards the 8th minute Phantomology rhythm is well settled around sequences which wave in loops, nervous percussions and a synth with a kind of talk box. A nervous and fragile rhythmic that heavy synth solos is wrapping, freeing in their attacks some shrill streaks which wind in a multicolored electronic universe of a rhythmic as complex as unusual. It's a good track that shows all the complexity surrounding the suave and frenzied rhythms of Summa Technologiae. Determinedly more rock, Creation of the Worlds begins with a dramatic intro where the synth waves and winds in a sphere of resonance. The rhythm becomes heavier and faster with weighty sequences which hem with robust percussions while the synth is waving there while fleeing laments wrapped with a beautiful mellotron fog. With firmness, Creation of the Worlds goes astray towards the more crystal clear sequences of Pasquinade On Evolution which collide delicately in the shade of a synth of which delicate solos perfume a synth aura where strange rustles of pastels are getting lost in the mists of a cosmic mellotron, concluding a first opus of

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    which lets glimpse an artist with a very convincing potential.




    Przemysław Rudź

    is a Polish musician living in Gdansk, who's Summa Technologiae is a musical interpretation of

    Stanislav Lem's

    book translated into a language of synthetic and mysterious sounds. After a deep atmospheric intro, Dilemmas kicks off with complex, clear sequencer patterns. They don't evolve any further though, staying too repetive too my liking. The fade-out of this piece also takes far too long. Two Evolutions sound far better to my ears with nice and moody old-school

    Jarre

    soundworlds and sequencing, but this feel doesn't last long as Space Civilizations is next. Here the superficial, free form soundscapes stay unattractive, later ending up in the hectic sequencing and busy, chaotic textures of Intellectronics.
    After quiet, atmospheric sound painting on the fifth piece, the 17-minute Phantomology announces itself. It’s the longest trip found here, but all the way also lacking interesting sonic content. Creation of the Worlds fortunately sounds more focussed, but a high solo sound makes it quickly annoying as well. The last piece can't make things up either.
    All in all, the groovy style mixed with chill-out and synth-pop flavours of Summa Technologiae just doesn't do it for me, despite the fresh sound and mastering quality and the beautiful artwork that graces the cd.

    Bert Strolenberg www.sonicimmersion.org



    The album begins with soft ambient washes, somewhat resembling the spacey moods conjured up by

    P. Namlook

    and

    T. Inoue

    throughout the Shades of Orion-series; soon, however, the music drifts in the direction of sequential patterns a la

    Jean-Michel Jarre

    , whose music was one of the most important sources of inspiration for

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    . In such a way, the introduction is a cross-over piece between chillout-lounge and rich textured sequential elpop. The next piece is an interesting combination of two different moods: There are, on the one hand, recurring,

    Jarre

    -like, icy chord-waves, and ,on the other hand, nice rhythmic patterns a bit like good old (about 1985)

    Marek Bilinski

    stuff. In the third piece there have remained only fat clouds of spinning chords, lively beats are there no more; hark, there it comes, endless serene Blue oozing out of the speakers... Still, quite soon a catchy ostinato in some low key lurks in, and the whole scene turns immediately into a haunting mood in the style of

    Tangerine Dream's

    Thief soundtrack... The main sequencer joins in and so we are ready to greet the fourth track, sheer ostinato-battlefield with pumping sequences and gloomy chords raining cats and dogs in the background... Indeed, we are not far away from amazing dynamics of

    Tangerine Dream's

    Horizon-suite (1984). Number five (so far my favourite one in the whole set) is an ingenuous conjoint of subtle ambient "nature sounds" and the grooviness of a programmed percussion-line, which is very upbeat but... with no single beat uttered, just mere whooshes of "electronic cymbals"! This fine arrangement makes it clear, that there is a whole lot of amassed energy, somehow never to be let out of the bag, though. This track reminds me of both parts of Xangadix by

    Pino & Wildjamin

    ; the Listener may take a walk across the rusty, sepia meadow, as if taken from some long forgotten photograph, and still so lively and sappy... be careful where you tread, watch this whole lot of cyberinsects fooling around amidst the wireblades of grass... The next piece consists of several contrasted parts; in the beginning, there resonate some ambient chords in a major key, then we have a nice foggy passage leading to a groovy, programmed coda, yet another fine combination of lounge music and solid elpop with a slight IDM touch to it. The seventh track brings some great sequencer-driven pads in fruity colours... This is a nice background for freefalling "fainting" sounds of the lead synth solo. This track merges with the final piece of the album, some of the previously introduced tunes get continued, but the whole track gets a bit quieter and, so to speak, a bit more spacey. The main attraction is a very fine solo tune (as if played on the legendary PPG Wave or yet more legendary Theremin), slyly balancing between sunny relax and minor (slightly chromatic) doubts... All in all, Summa Technologiae is a multi-coloured album, a good portion of fine electronic music, which sounds fresh, rich and crystal clear at the same time.

    Igor Wróblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 1CD


    11,01 EUR
  • Odyssey | X - Space Odyssey

    Odyssey | X - Space Odyssey

    Bestseller

    A further multidimensional work by Tomasz Pauszek a.k.a. Odyssey: This album is a convincing mixture of "fine-tuned" sequential electronics, organic ambient music and dynamic electronic rock-pop based on ingenuously programmed percussive patterns.
    Space Overture leads the Listener immediately into some other world, world filled with a cosmic scent of freshly charged batteries - while Between Worlds with its dynamic rhythm-sequences allows the Listener to balance on the edge of the well-known world and some other totally different one, paved with light-blue anti-gravitational stepping stones. One of the most fascinating pieces in the set is doubtless Silver Q, a very dynamic and still very subtle one, with "hidden" percussion pads, rather thought-of than really present. The most important factor of this composition are floating chords "smeared" in the background and some further washes and sweeps; this impression definitely has something in the mood of Klaus Schulze's murky numbness in Silent Running (Trancefer, 1981). The next track, The Deep, also consists basically in skillful conjuring-up of Schulzean moods and harmonies, this time rather in the mood of The Beat Planante (Inter*face, 1985), whereas smeared chill-out chords are not as important as the title "depth", got into with a little help from percussive marks, vocoder pads and echoing chord waves mixed together in one go. Stellar Blue is a conclusion of a bigger whole, drifting yet further in the direction of frosty abstract ambience, and still perfectly shaped and divided in clear rhythmic phrases. Bringing the Light breaks the journey into the abyss of oblivion and marks a sudden change of mood: there it comes, a shiny ostinato slightly touched by nice phasing of a Timewind, with a melancholic keyboard melody a'la JMJ's Oxygene or Les Chants Magnetiques wrought into it. Zenithal is a further break in telling cosmic stories: we are getting closer to IDM and rhythmic laptop ambience than to typical Berlin-inspired electronica. I.O. and Lunar Sky are splendid el-pop pieces in two different moods: the first one is very lively, dynamic and groovy, whilst the other one is very relaxing, soothing and almost ethereal: cloudy soundscaped passing slowly across the evening sky. And then - time for a dessert: two homages to Jean Michel Jarre. Planet B definitely has something in common with experiments presented on Printemps du Bourges, whereas Oxygeum, as its title already suggests, brings a handful of nostalgic ostinatos and melodies skillfully styled-up to resemble characteristic PPG Wave 2-sounds - well, this is how Oxygene 14 or Equinoxe 9 would have sounded like! Odyssey has prepared 120 minutes of enthralling music, which is jolly hard to be classified insofar as the elements of sequential electronica, el-pop, chill-out and ambient music get melanged in one interesting whole, and what joy, there are almost no pauses between the tracks, so that there is "automatically" more atmosphere and depth, more time to contemplate. A musical journey definitely worth being taken.

    Igor Wróblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 2CD


    8,76 EUR
  • Tomasz Zawadziński | Saved As

    Tomasz Zawadziński | Saved As

    Bestseller Good price

    After 5 years of silence, Tomasz Zawadzinski makes a return on disk with an album containing tracks wrote between 2000 and 2007. A collection of titles forgotten in his musical attic among which the influences of Tangerine Dream, area Exit, The Thief and Wavelength cannot be ignored. More Cartesian than Sounds Like Pictures and Follow Me with 8 very melodious pieces of music. Saved As follows Follow Me tangent where Zawadzinski showed a surprising musical versatility.
    A heavy reverberation opens the musical doors of The Search. We are in fully into Exit area with a synth to resonant sparks of which tentacular fibers form soft oriental strata, while a wriggling sequence draws a nervous tempo where sequences chords skip like bouncing balls of undisciplined heights. References to Dream abound here on this piece of music; hopping sequences subdivided into several fragments, fluid synths, almost whispering ones, and harmonious, percussions in Poland style. Brief, a musical universe that we know ears deeply, except for this so personal touch of Tomasz Zawadzinski who modulates and splits his rhythms with softness and ability, beneath beautiful enchanting and melancholic strata, as well as beautiful synth solos. Imaginative, warm, sometimes nostalgic and well drawn solos, a little as the musical universe he used us to. Softer, in spite of its keys of a keyboard filled of resonances, One million of Stars is a cosmic ode which unravels such a soft melody with a synth weakened by beautiful dreamlike solos. A soft sequential movement shapes a soft rhythmic which accentuates gradually by heavy resonant notes which are always encircled by this soft dreamy synth. Analog Pulse starts as a soft cosmic bed song with spaced out chords which float in an oblivion illuminated by brief synthesized breaths. A little jazzy piece of music where Spyra influences can be heard, here and there. In the middle, a sequence espouses these dreamy chords which were wandering in the cosmos, molding a steadier rhythm beneath a synth to resonant solos.
    The intro of Another World plunges us into a strange outer space where misled keys float slowly under a discreet pulsation. The rhythm livens up around this sound constellation, as a linear race where sequences run under suave pads of a stoical synth and chords of a keyboard which run in loops in a semi cosmic trance. The kind of music we would expected by Kraftwerk if they had put aside their robotic musical approach. Intro with a synth to vaporous solos and hesitating paces, Beats & Pads eventually lays a tempo fed by zigzagging sequences. A strange track which is situated between two rhythms and which swims in a synthesized cortex unique to Tomasz Zawadzinski musical world, which amazes with a techno finale inflated to pulsating steroids.
    Electronic Bossanova has of its title only a strange sonorous rumba of which the rhythmic bases are soft sequences which roll in muddled loops under a keyboard to erratic chords and a synth to suave solo. Another delicate title where arpeggios skip slightly under hazes of a morphic synth, Rhythmic Waves seems to come out of a Wavelength recording session. A very beautiful title which mystifies at each listening, so much the musical depth there is omnipresent.
    I would say less colossal than Sounds Like Pictures and Follow Me, than I would be fair. Because, although very melodious, Saved As misses a little of the audacity that characterized the first 2 albums of Tomasz Zawadzinski on generator pl. label. Nevertheless, it is a very beautiful album where the Polish synthesist preserves this dreamlike tenderness that made so much the charms of his previous albums with title like Analog Pulse, Electronic Bossanova and Rhythmic Waves. Those who like ambiguous tones of the digital years Tangerine Dream are going to be crazy about The Search and Beats and Pads. In any good consider, if there was an album to introduce you to the world of Tomasz Zawadzinski, I would recommend Saved As. A good way to polish you ears before melting for Sounds Like Pictures and Follow Me.

    Sylvain Lupari




    I assume there is not a single devoted Berlin School-fan, who wouldn't associate the title track The Search immediately with one of the most enthralling impressions made by Tangerine Dream at the peak of their career. Tomasz Zawadzinski also gives the opener of his newest record Saved As such a title and this a very good sign indeed. The album has exactly the Virgin-Years-of-Tangerine-Dream atmosphere, but still it wouldn't be fair to talk about copying Tangerine Dream's arrangements and feels - although once upon a time one obviously had to invent the sequential formula and the descendants' task is every now and then not that difficult. Zawadzinski does not imitate Edgar Froese & Co., he is simply able to take the Listener on a journey to some other possible world, where there reigns an atmosphere as impressive as the very one known from the classical Berlin School works. The Search is in such a way both intuitive and melodious, conceptually open and musically (teleo)logical, abstract and film-like. All these attributes could easily be used to describe the whole album. Zawadzinski's impressions, even when they are rather short, help the Listener fall into a specific audio-visual trance, into a particular colourful mood, and exactly this is and should be the very goal of powerful sequential electronica... The title of the second track is Millions of Stars, but the piece has also here more in common with Tangerine Dream - soundtracks as with Jean-Michel Jarre's Metamorphoses. Analog Pulses and Another World are good old pumping sequential-impressions combining typical Berlin-dynamics and "spatial swinging" as far as chords and short improvisations are concerned. In Beats / Pads Zawadzinski once more conjures a Tangerine Dream - atmosphere, but this time we sail - or fly - towards younger lands, those inhabited by Dream Mixes-like sounds. Electronic Bossanova comes with an attractive, sad, velvet solo appearing on a slightly nostalgic background, and the final Rhythmic Waves emerges from an ingeniously simple - and thereby ingeniously powerful - sequential theme, somewhat related to "rhythmic waves" generated by the members of Kraftwerk back in the eighties. Saved As is a great and complex work - it's impossible not to hear that Zawadzinski not only loves, but simply feels the groove and the atmosphere of electronic music. He has plenty to say here on the electronic field, and he creates his sequential moods in a slyly fresh way.

    Igor Wróblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 1CD


    7,64 EUR
  • Aquavoice | Memories

    Aquavoice | Memories

    Bestseller Good price

    After an album so syncretic, abstract and atonal such as Cold, we were able of asking ourselves what could we expect from the Polish synthesist Tadeusz Luczejko. Memories, 8th album of Aquavoice and 2nd on Generator pl. label, is no more and no less an extension of Cold. An album of which the multiplicity of sound collages abounds in a heterogeneous musical fauna where the statism (fixity) and the abstract are in constant duality with soft harmonies, rhythms a la Portishead and Spyra on ambient passages which have nothing to envy of those from Brian Eno's surrealist musical world and electro acoustics of Plastikman.
    Creaking static noises astride a reverberating loop on News of the World opening. Percussions in felted banging charge on a pulsating line of bass, shaping a delicate tempo of soft techno which gives a minimalism rhythmic surrounded by strange dialects of an animal fauna discovered by Johannes Schmoelling on Wuivend Riet and a mixture of exotic languages. News of the World opens in strength and will be the only title of Memories to offer a good rhythmic constancy. North and News of the World II offers structures soft rhythmic tendencies, but they are a bit more smothered and tempo is developing gradually, after soft foggy passages. Nostalgy, Old Ship, Lonelyness and Mirror are familiar journeys where the abstract world of Cold merged with ill-assorted sound elements in a vase of ether. If you loved Cold, these will charm you for sure. Dancing Snowflakes offers an unknown variance by Aquavoice, a little as Memories, with a slight rhythm' groovy bass with a suave and warm tempo which embraces fragrances of a jazz misled in its spheres. Tracks that are very near the Spyra style. With its thunders and showers Autumn, quite as Labyrinth, brings a very melancholic, even gloomy touch to a sound universe always dressed in its tones as varied as the areas visited by a horde of artists to audacious sampling. After a heavy atonal intro, where voices of a parallelism world goes alongside to quirky tones of a syncretic universe, Tycho B. adopts a soft hypnotic swinging to light pulsations flooded in twisted resonances and synth to bewitching solos. A title which subdivides its structure to embrace a softer and moving final, shaping one of the good tracks on Memories.
    After the very introvert Cold where the rhythms were rarer than the oxygen on the Moon, Memories develops a soft rhythmic envelope with a multitude of nuances and feelings. Soft progressive tempos which cogitate between two worlds to cadenced paradoxes, submerged of a flock of sound effects at once innovative and standardized by groups such as Portishead, Death in Vegas and Chemical Brothers (especially at the levels of old lp's static and clicks).
    In brief, it's kind of a Cold but with more heat and relief!

    Sylvain Lupari www.gutsofdarkness.com & www.planetorigo.com




    Aquavoice had once recorded for Generator.pl a soothing, ethereal CD entitled Cold - his next album, Memories, provides the Listener with yet more fascinating moods, some of them quite surprising, some of them ingeniously suggestive and associative, as if taken directly from some surreal dream. Analogue, digital and computer tones get mixed into one melange together with assorted nature sounds and additional sample loops. What kind of music is this, actually? Hard to say indeed, insofar as Aquavoice's impressions stretch out over typical classifications, as far as melodies, arrangements, structures and moods are concerned... The dynamic piece News of the World bears some resemblance to moods created by the New Composers from St. Petersburg, whereas the next piece, Nostalgy, brings with the loop-pattern of a dusty sliding turntable some memories in sepia brown: Is it some familiar place from the Listener's childhood, or is it the fabulous Everglades-park? In any case, here we are dealing with probably the most beautiful piece in the whole Memories - set. Still, the crunchy freezing nostalgia of sleepy electronic bits in Dancing Snowflakes or jazzy relaxing chords of Autumn, dry-leaf-like sifted through the sleeping hourglass, while the rain is still pouring outside, are equally fascinating and sound equally fresh. Track 5: Mysterious meanders of Labyrinth get marked with percussive sips leading to further confusing scrubheads lurking in the vibraphone weather. We take a walk through a deserted old town as soon as Tycho B. begins, here we are dealing with electronic moods quite similar to those conjured up by Tangerine Dream on the Flashpoint - soundtrack, and still coming from some thoroughly different dimension. Old Ship is one of the most abstract pieces on the CD; disintegrated in associative, freefalling tones, it fascinates with its overall mouldiness. Then comes the title-track and the Listener can arrange some long forgotten photos, to read some new, rattling and chirping meanings out of them. Loneliness balances on the edge of lonely sadness and lonely bliss. And what is hiding there, in these odd spongy pipelines, leading to a grayish cloud of fluorescent cotton far away in the North?... Listen... Part Two of News of the World seems to be a picture with no frame - or perhaps a frame without a picture - a tiny mood of quiet beats scattered around, a puzzle left on the table, which can be seen only in the mirror... Perhaps it is this very Mirror, to which the last piece on the album was dedicated: We discover, that the room-reality and the mirror-reality are two quite different worlds; we notice the most significant discrepancies, while we stroll to the abstract rhythm of the hourglass-ambience. What can I say... Big respect, it is such a suggestive, impressive and puzzling album...

    Igor Wróblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 1CD


    7,64 EUR
  • Yarek | Organix

    Yarek | Organix

    Bestseller Good price

    A while after his splendid debut in the Generator.pl label, Yarek prepared a new work: Organix. This album is filled with satisfying, deep, rich sounds, already from the very beginning of the China Town - introduction: what we are dealing here with is a truly moving melange of analogue and digital/computer sound-layers. Daab is not exactly that kind of Dub associated with Bill Laswell or Mad Professor; it is rather a chilling-blue hommage to Jean Michel Jarre and his famous Oxygene. Delfin is for me the best piece on the whole album, a fascinating synthesis of traditional Berlin-inspired electronica and abstract "new sounds": on the one hand we have here a smooth, polifonic ostinato, on the other hand some vocal samples as if taken directly from a dark-ambient piece by Monolake! The fourth piece in the set, Fluidion, is a further proof that Yarek is an ingenious eclectic composer: convex and concave shiny ostinato-structured sounds in the background are deeply rooted in the sequential tradition, whereas the sheer tempo of the piece and some further arrangement details make this composition an ideal candidate for some nice Fax Records Compilation (well, a compilation filled with "well-tempered", Passing Airwhales - like impressions rather than granular-synthesis - or techno-experiments, that's for sure). My next favourite one, apart from Delfin, is the fifth piece entitled Lachemma. Yarek was without any doubt fascinated with contemporary Klaus Schulze's music as presented on Farscape or Contemporary Works. The Listener will be very satisfied with this impression, filled with dreamy abandoned sequences with a slight ethno-flavour, skillfully combined with improvised ad-libitum female vocals. Three further impressions: Koralowa Rafa, No Sequence and Radio Active are multi-layered recordings rich in vocal and abstract samples: Yarek definitely had a jolly good idea how to combine traditional sequential electronica, Jean-Michel Jarre's influences and Frankfurt chill-out in a very fresh way. Wiena is a subtle play between sultry dissonances and chrome-tissued chords plus some sombre solo-synthesizer phasing bringing in the mood of a navy-blue, digitalized snake, climbing over sequential rocks and stones. This piece is my third favourite one in the Organix set. The final composition Zx Electro is an intriguing development of sombre, murky moods presented before, every now and then with less beats and sequential blocks; after a while there reigns perfect darkness, and still there are some synthesizer murmurs and recurring sample waves to be found in the spectacle. A very fascinating and very "organic" journey indeed... a highly recommended one.

    Igor Wróblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 1CD


    7,64 EUR
  • Odyssey | Syntharsis

    Odyssey | Syntharsis

    Bestseller
    It's with the very ambient and cosmic The Space Inside, which we find on Awakenings 2007 Vol.I, that

    Odyssey

    resuscitated of its ambient and astral waves. Initially released in 2001 by the contemporary artist and Poland EM producer

    Tomasz Pauszek

    , Syntharsis knew a brief succ's d'estime' on Polish, Norwegian and Dutch radios waves while spawning around in the circles of underground and experimental music, as well as in France and England. Reedited by the Polish label Generator.pl. in a double CD format, Syntharsis is reborn of its tones with a new mastering, besides offering unreleased material write at the same period and some remixes of tracks that hook the attention of fans when initially released. A double album to the antipodes of an ambient and vitamined music in down tempo structures,

    Odyssey

    is a soft strangely mesmerizing reflection of a world divided between its elements.
    An aquatic world with sonorities of a metallic fusion universe opens the first waves of Inner Intrusion. A track to hybrid atmospheres where the cosmos drags the wanderings of an earth of desolation, Inner Intrusion roams such an astral ghost on a synth line with fine loops which are interlacing in the echo of the waves on a linear movement. An atonal movement draped by a thick cloud of sound effects which float in a cerebral oblivion, Inner Intrusion is a curious sonorous fusion of which the entanglement of sound waves shapes a fascinating morphic melody. A threadlike metallic line tears The Space Inside's introductory veil which lets filter a sound prism stuffed with cosmic heterogeneous tones. Synth layers are morphic and waltz with a big emotionalism in an oniric cosmos a'la

    Jarre

    , drawing superb exhilarating curves which are entangling with a strange astral sensualism. A great floating track, The Space Inside is unarguably the cornerstone of Syntharsis and spreads his recollections and floating roots beyond its boundaries to wrap the languishing and cosmic Reincarnation and of whom every blow of scattered percussion molds a rhythm which dawdles in odd loopy pulsations. These latent rhythms which look for themselves in the hatching of a semi ambient music teem on Syntharsis, as proves the syncretic and enigmatic Re:Synthesis and Re:Versed Worlds, which is filled with

    Michael Stearns'

    aromas, the sparkling Re:Phlexess and the poetic S.T.A.R.S.
    Oscillating between the ambient and the down tempo, the rhythm is not totally absent in Syntharsis. After a very ambient intro, Neurogenesis is lighting up on a beautiful bass line which hems on fine percussions that sound like hypnotic pulsations. The tempo espouses a kind of groovy lounge which dances on a delicate syncopated line. With a shy and delicate rhythm, Neurogenesis adheres to Plastikman's kind of electro acoustics cadences before melting in a more New Wave structure with its quixotic violins which surround a delicate techno'd'beat. Time and Deep is cemented in ambient but tortured by percussions without rhythms or cadences. A heavy ambient track sculptured in the depth of cosmic winds and embellished by a beautiful synth which blows a perpetual astral melody. Sunlight offers a rhythmic structure clearly more sharp edgy with its arpeggios which swirl violently in the breezes of its intro. Percussions heavy of resonances, pound a circular rhythm flied over by keyboard keys which swirl restlessly, guiding Sunlight towards a more melodious phase. A nice melody sung by a soft keyboard of which chords are constantly wrapped by arpeggios circulating with anarchy on an ambivalent structure where the beauty of harmonies is caught by acrimonious electronic tones before diving into the interstellar abyss which wraps this very first opus of

    Odyssey

    .
    Contrary to CD 1, where the rhythms were scattered among ambient structures, the CD 2 of Syntharsis proposes a subtle and nice progress in rhythms. After the very atmospheric and cosmic Beyond S.T.A.R.S., Constellations of Mind is propelled by heavy ambient winds, like strata waltzing in cosmos. The synth sonorities are as much suave as shrill, while brief rhythmic attempts try to emerge from this heavy ambient membrane, quite as in Traces of Reality - Terra Eois. We feel there

    Jarre

    influences with electronic tones and oscillations a bit more dramatic which circulate on wide atmospheric strips. Moreover

    Jarre

    influences are very omnipresent on this 2nd portion of Syntharsis, as on Traces of Reality - Snapshots where sounds of camera clicking for snapshots abound on a of Moon techno tempo style. After an atmospheric intro the hiccupping rhythm of Structures is setting up. The rhythm is curt and embraces a structure oscillating between techno and down tempo with good percussions which hammers and machine-guns a slightly syncopated pace. More cleared and arched on quite ingenious electronic percussions, The Logical Structures offers a suave down tempo with very Jarrian influences while Innercity is sharply more frenzied and chaotic with its nervous and jerky rhythm, coated by strata of a copper synth. The 2nd portion is very lively and infectious with solid percussions which explode on a pace broken by violent rhythmic jolts. By far the most furious track on Syntharsis, Innercity is a powerful track ideal for hot dance floors. Neurogenesis Radio 2008 Edit and Extended Mix are rather faithful to the original, while Flat Three Remix proposes a more resonant and fluid rhythm on slamming percussions. The bass line spits heavy notes and percussions hammer a hypnotic tempo whereas synths are harmonious and throw a catchy mellotron veil, giving to this Flat Three Remix a techno air with 80's New Wave hint, while Aphex Glitch Mix is more intriguing but less lively on the rhythmic level. Time and Deep (X-Tended Version) is an identical version, but longer than he one proposed on CD 1. I have nothing against, because it's a beautiful track which is bloody more attractive with the Lo-Fi Air Remix because less metallic.
    The music of

    Odyssey

    is astonishly rich. It's evident that

    Odyssey

    likes multiplying synth layers and molding heavy musical atmospheres which spread such as slow morphic ballets.

    Odyssey's

    Syntharsis is sculptured in musical atmospheres, sometimes ambient and sometimes cadenced, where down tempo and ambient music is covered with beautiful sound effects as electronic as eclectic. It's a nice double album of which the variance of styles can please as much fans of soft techno, down tempo and floating music.

    Sylvain Lupari gutsofdarkness.com & synth&sequences.com



    Odyssey

    is a project of the Polish electronic media artist and contemporary electronic music producer

    Tomasz Pauszek

    , who previously published the track The Space Inside on the Awakenings 2007 vol. 1 compilation.
    The Generator.pl version of Syntharsis is actually a special re-edition of

    Odyssey's

    debut album (which appeared in 2001), as it features previously unreleased session outtakes and a bundle of remixes on a bonus cd.
    What we got here is fresh sounding collection of compelling and modern electronics, nicely kicking off with the atmospheric dwellings of Inner Intrusion, followed by the expansive synth pads of The Space Inside, a warm, swirling but powerful ambient breeze with a slight

    Jarre

    -flavour. Re:incarnation is next with its free form, captivating and overall airy soundtextures, after which the music on Neurogenesis turns a bit more groovy and dynamic form as soft beats and light sequencing enter the sound stage all together creating a moody and light downtempo ambientscape.
    Re:synthesis takes on a experimental, more abstract but unpleasant form, vaguely reminding of

    Peter Gabriel's

    cinematic work Birdy. The same goes for the hypnotizing, slowly morphing Re:phlexess, a h2 piece found at the end of the album.
    Airy, formless and fairly hallucinating atmospheres continue on S.t.a.r.s. and Re-versed worlds, ending up in gracious, uplifting ambient textures on the latter track. Time and Deep is quite a weird and inconsistent track after that. The last track is the dynamic, sequenced but not that coherent Sunlight.
    Now to the second disc, which e.g. holds well-done atmospheric pieces such as Constellations of Mind, although the mechanic sequentials of the Terra Eois-version of Traces of Reality coming after it didn't grab me at all. After a moody intro, rather high-tech sequencing and dance beats lead the way on Structures.
    Les Structures Logiques (featuring

    Polaris

    ) is an upbeat but also more traditional sounding piece with a hint of

    Jarre

    . Innercity sounds like a neurotic beat-track to me, but luckily the next to mixes of the groovy track Neurogenesis after it make up for that in a positive manner. The other two mixes of the same track don't do it for me with their high-tech but also rather emotionless impact, which also applies for the two versions of the experimental flavoured Time and Deep.

    Bert Strolenberg www.sonicimmersion.org



    Beyond any doubt, it is the most mature work in

    Tomasz Pauszek's

    (a.k.a.

    Odyssey

    ) discography. Syntharsis 2009 is a special re-edition of

    Odyssey's

    debut material, special insofar, as the Listener does not only get the original remastered album, but also a bonus CD including previously unreleased session outtakes and a bundle of remixes. The album is a fresh synthesis of "TD-getting-younger" - sequential electronics (

    Tangerine Dream

    in their "Melrose Years" up until now), solid lounge and slightly clubby elpop. This record is fairly groovy - let's pay attention to marvellous bass lines every now and then - and still the best single word to describe the feeling throughout the CD would be "flow":

    Odyssey's

    music is very "aerodynamic" and turns out to be a fantastically fluent electronic narration. There are neither "typically dynamic" nor "typically ambient" tracks to find here, rather all episodes are multi-mood, multi-track and poly-meaningful.

    Odyssey's

    music is a "fresh-making" and a breeze-light one; one could easily imagine it as a film soundtrack - and indeed, it's worth mentioning how much in common some pieces here have with

    Peter Gabriel's

    Birdy - OST (1985): Rephlexes and, in the very first place, Resynthesis. Time/Deep, one of the album "hits" remixed on disk #2, could have been a

    Jean Michel Jarre

    Geometry of Love - or Printemps de Bourges - piece on the one hand, while on the other hand we have here a nice piece of quasi

    Björk

    -ish mood in the chord-background (pick up some of

    Björk's

    Homogenic or Post single remixes and you'll see what I exactly mean). As far as associations with

    J.M. Jarre

    are concerned, they are just welcome in case of Sunlight (romantic piano line and nostalgic chords going along nicely with modern programming and various scratchy and crunchy effects). Very interesting are also Snapshots mechanical sequentials and a tasty spectrum of moods in Terra Eois, where

    Odyssey

    is quite successful indeed in deconstructing the artificial frontiers between "traditional" electronica, new-age, club-sounds and lite-ambient. It must be mentioned that

    Odyssey's

    "art of sequencing" is on the whole very good and creative, it's not just another variation on TD-patterns, but rather a challenging, daring attitude, something like experiments by

    Pino & Wildjamin

    or

    Beatboys 2000

    , whereas the artists just mentioned successfully combined sequential and acid, but that’s it, and meanwhile

    Odyssey's

    style and technique are one step further, so to speak. Mature, developed, multi-layered arrangements are doubtless one of the finest

    Odyssey's

    qualities here - this also has to be put straight. Last but not least, I really do recommend disk-two-remixes, especially the

    Aphex Glitch Version

    of Neurogenesis, perhaps not really in

    Aphex Twin

    or Glitch style, but it is certainly pretty fine stuff as if created by such remixers as Bitstream or Kid 606.

    Igor Wróblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 2CD


    8,76 EUR
  • Scamall | A World Behind the Silence

    Scamall | A World Behind the Silence

    Bestseller Good price

    A World Behind the Silence is another sound adventure coming from Poland. After Brunette Models the Generator.pl label introduces another artist, Scamall, with a rather particular vision of EM. Contrast and paradox of a world however melancholic, but highly abstract, A World behind the Silence is a true exploration of a world which does not have anything silencer. A complex sound universe where Scamall amalgamates with wonder pummeling metallic alloy and heteroclite sonorities moulded by sound samplings to an ambient music with a tender trickle melancholy.
    Offline begins this sound adventure with static noises absorptive by a metalized entity which intermingles on a linear movement, without really drawing a coherent musical structure. An intro presenting an album that mixes jagged and eroded sonorities by narrow scratched passages, a little as if we were cut from the universe by wave interferences, with long and slow ambient and sinuous passages poured in industrialized spheres. Anti-music or abstract art? Jakub Kmiec gets inspired by forsaken and afflicting places of Sweden and Ireland to create this sound homily for silence. But a silence constantly fractured of caustic sounds which gently pour towards tender passages where melancholy makes a hole in this opaque wall of triturated sounds. As on Warts and All where a beautiful meditative line encircles an intro as noisy as Offline. Linear, the movement resembles cardiac pulsations on a hatched line where deformed noises and incongruous sonorities sprinkle this sound horizon escapes from which fine piano notes. It's difficult to describe A World behind the Silence. The album is constantly torn between a strange synergy of metallic squealing and crackling which shorts-circuit strange melancholic softnesses as on Screaming Trees and the spectral procession of Wrapped. Vanishing Haze is a slow meditative track crossed by innumerable breaths of a metal coldness, where fine musical bits force in order to weave a melodious tapestry. Idem for Bright which is on the other hand more cordial, whereas Before the Silence Falls brings us in a surrealist paranoiac universe where the soft madness occults fine softnesses of an overwhelming human sadness on short breaks liven up by a hesitant tempo.
    In World behind the Silence is a curious exercise in styles. Scamall visits abstract territories which will make the delights of Tetsu Inoue fans and certain titles of the FAX catalogue. As for me, it is not really my cup of tea. I quite liked this mixture of noises crushed and shredded by jaws with barbed wires teeth on long ambient and morphic music. But sometimes just of the music, without noises, would have been superbly delicious. For sound adventurers.

    Sylvain Lupari gutsofdarkness.com & synth&sequences.com




    Scamall is a project of Jakub Kmiec, who found the main inspiration for this album in desolated places in Sweden and Ireland. A World behind the Silence is a 49-minute work of adventurous music that "consists of soundscapes incorporating abandoned and originally useless noises". Neurotic break beats, harsh bleeps, clicks and noises take off on the first track, fortunately soon ending up in ghostly atmospheres and textures with creepy effects. The soundscapes meander forth in the far more pleasant Warts and All, although rough edges and effects keep being scattered through the sound spectrum. Screaming Trees is another abstract, dark and drifting ambient excursion with light rhythmic elements, creating an otherworldly sonic environment. Wrapped is next with crunchy murmurs and more harsh and creepy effects over flowing soundscapes, which is harder to endure. Vanishing Haze continues in the tradition of Eno's Ambient 4 with sustained piano phrases hovering over mysterious textural plains. Morphing ambient layers, radio snippets and deformed nature sounds make up the interesting and overall cinematic Bright. The ghostly flavours of Before the Silence falls end the cd in the drony, organic and experimental style quite similar to the music of Tetsu Inoue.
    The previous description makes it clear this not an easy-going work of atmospheric music, but one demanding an attentive pair of adventurous ears.
    All in all, this well-produced cd of murky, grainy, strongly organic flavoured ambient-music makes up a challenge for any experienced ambient music fan.

    Bert Strolenberg www.sonicimmersion.org




    In the beginning, there appear some harsh, neurotic breakbeats as if it were a Warp Records production (compare Aphex Twin's vinyl EP's). Offline is nonetheless not a typical Scamall track, rather a mere introduction to a mysterious, slow-motion, virtually beatless record. Scamall's music just cannot be easily classified; broadly speaking, it's murky, grainy, ferric-crunchy ambient-music, but there is more to style diversity than this. Warts and all has a specific neurotic unquietness in the sequential layer and features some sombre rainscapes in the numb background. Screaming Trees is an abstract miniature, where there are some experimental noise patterns scattered all around, but which, as a whole, also speaks ambient language (these dreamy, autoreplicating samples and bits, floating on black waters...). Wrapped and Vanishing Haze are dark-ambient jewels worthy of being put on dome of Brian Eno CDs. The final pieces made me exclaim, Pete Namlook would be glad to have an opportunity to release this stuff on his Fax Label! - Bright is an ingenious textural melange of ambient layers and deformed nature sounds, a bit like some of Biosphere youngest pieces, whereas the album’s conclusion sounds a bit like Tetsu Inoue organic stuff, it is exactly that mysterious, dreamy, drony and monochrome. One could associate this album with works by Boddy & Carter, Jochem Paap or the beatless Steve Stoll, but these are just direction-markers, Scamall's music remains now and then very individual and original. Beyond any doubt, this CD is a tough one for "traditional" electronica lovers, well, even devoted ambient-fans could find this album quite a challenge. Still, the most important fact about A World... is, that Scamall catches our attention immediately in the beginning and keeps us in tension until the very last second. Scamall was definitely able here to build his own fascinating world, and this he did do with just a little help from such familiar sound structures, one could say... When it works, it means that he's not "just another keyboard player", he's an artist. Strongly recommended.

    Igor Wróblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 1CD


    6,52 EUR
  • Tomasz Zawadziński | Follow Me

    Tomasz Zawadziński | Follow Me

    Bestseller Good price
    After a stunning 1'st album where

    Tomasz Zawadzinski

    explored a musical universe very near the roots of a Berlin School,

    Tangerine Dream

    style and even a little of cosmic rock, the Polish synthesist offers in Follow Me an album immensely more personal. A 2nd album released in 2004 and which demonstrates the fickleness of

    Tomasz Zawadzinski

    to create atmospheres rich in heterogeneous tones where the listener can imagine an interesting virtual world, abundantly illustrated by a sound wealth which seems without borders. With Follow Me

    Tomasz Zawadzinski

    does not waste time returning on the paths of his 1'st album. Towards the 5 tracks that compose his 2nd opus, he weaves synthesized labyrinths which exceed the borders of the imagination, being always inspired by the Berlin School style but the one we call the second wave which brought interesting names as

    Software

    ,

    Mergener

    /

    Weisser

    ,

    Paul Nagle

    and

    Spyra

    .
    If You Feel opens with an intro of soft floating strata soothed by chirping and hooting of a pleiad of birds to phantasmagorical singings such as oviparous sirens. An intro to ambient atmospheres, such as structured on each of Follow Me 5 titles, that evolves slowly. A little as if we were in a black cosmos where we could see stars moving with a morphic passivity with slow sinuous movements which shape a timeless waltz that dance with a dreamlike delicacy. Sequences come to graft to this cosmic waltz, molding a soft rhythm of which ascending pulsations form a strange rhythmic waterfall to hybrid forms assaulted by a divine synth which blows its celestial harmonies. Of which this splendid refrain that magnetizes the ear and spawns among a keyboard with keys as limpid as nervous and these warm synthesized strata which already bitten our soul since If You Feel intro. A superb track which still bewitches me and for which I always try to listen again, quite as the very beautiful If You Need which opens with beautiful strata of floating waltzes, as the poetic universe of

    Software

    on Electronic Universe. A soft pulsating sequence, more sober this time, shapes a warmly suave rhythm. A pace that flows in the shade of a very beautiful synth filled of enveloping layers and melodious lines. If You Want starts with an unusual rain of heteroclite tones, little as drops of wooden rains which bounce on a tight drum skin. A synth pierces this strange shower and spreads a hedging pad, while another layer with trumpet tone is slipping through shaping an ambient dreamlike texture. A sequential movement appears and subdivides the pace with striking of cupping style which team up to beautiful chords from a limpid keyboard, moulding a rhythmic universe as chaotic as unexpected under a serene musical approach among a synth to delicate approaches and fine solos of which discretions are get lost in a galactic foggy. A beautiful title of an incredible delicacy for a rhythmic structure so unusual.
    This sequential approach to assorted tones and oversize cadences is the cornerstone of Follow Me. If You Can begins with synthesized layers which run slowly on the dunes of a galactic beach. An exotic sound landscape ornamented with strata of an idle synth and with the singings of fanciful birds. A slow atmospheric intro where crystalline chords toll the knell to a sequential opening filled by heterogeneous tone, as teeth comb that we rub on a manual saw. Chaotic and undisciplined, these sequences skip in every direction beneath the layers of a soft mellotron synth, shaping a strange melody in the harmonious paradox that we can also hear on If You Miss finale which, after a soft morphic departure, waves on sequences which skip in a harmonious indiscipline and subdivides a rhythmic wrapped of a soft synth to wrapping strata.
    A superb album, Follow Me is clearly more different than Sounds Like Pictures. Although always avant-gardism and surprising,

    Tomasz Zawadzinski

    presents a more poetic album and closer to contemporary sonorities, giving an album rich in sound textures and melodious approaches. Being a big fan of a sound wealth that the digital sound world established with the ingenuity of

    Software

    and

    Mergener

    /

    Weisser

    of Innovative Communication, Follow Me can only subject me. And with titles as powerful as If You Feel and If You Miss, which entangle with other tracks as exotic as melodious, we can't let such an album passed by. I liked it a lot and I h2ly recommend it, especially if the period of IC and

    Johannes Schmoelling's

    first solo album (Wuivend Riet) charmed you, because we find this magic of sounds there which few dare to exploit, even if we speak about EM here!

    Sylvain Lupari



    The Polish Generator.pl label must have a lot of faith in music of

    Thomasz Zawadzinski

    as Follow Me is the musician's second release this year. On the other hand, the moody and well produced music of this guy is made up of nicely layered textural, highly cinematic soundscapes and rich elements of the Berliner School style, featuring occasional melancholic undercurrents in the freeform passages. Especially the nice cascading sequencing patterns at the core of

    Zawadzinski's

    sonic adventures make his engaging music sparkle. Warm, sustained soundpads and lots of atmospheric depth do the rest on the five long pieces, breathing both nostalgic as modern vibes. Of all pieces, the slowly evolving 18-minute opening track If You Feel is my favourite.
    Mr

    Zawadzinski

    sure is a talent of sound-paintings, so make sure you don't miss out on his music.

    Bert Strolenberg



    Follow Me - certainly towards magical electronic lands, spooky tonal jungles, which remind us so much of those painted by the masters of Berlin School or their talented descendants. Already the very first track on the album signifies a very nice surprise for devoted fans of Early-Virgin-Years

    Tangerine Dream

    : The awakening of a yellowish exotic forest at dawn has exactly that murky vibe we remember from TD's Zeit and Atem! This mélange of fascinating abstract soundscapes then makes room for a soothing electronic impression, perhaps a bit melancholic, but still underlined with optimistic notes. The second piece emerges from an interesting passage of some mysterious crisps and chirps, and leads to places which have very much in common with those so ingeniously "described" by

    Wolfram Spyra

    especially on his Fax-Recordings: there it is, a soft "rainy" tune, jazzy swinging between tonal systems, and "vibraphone" dreamy sounds as if taken from a film soundtrack. Track three, probably the best one on the record, consists mostly of numb and milky synthesizer lights, reflecting and sliding on some deep black electronic pond, dreamt about in a minor scale - one could compare the atmosphere of this piece with moods conjured up by

    Klaus Schulze

    on the Body Love and Mirage albums! Track four gives the Listener a handful of sounds and arrangements both rooted in the Berlin Scene sound and eclectic, future-oriented, as if taken from a random

    Paul Nagle

    album. The final track is probably the most "traditional" one here - I mean obviously the Berlin School tradition - but still all the recognizable influences were filtered through the innovative imagination of the artist. Let us give this record a careful listen and we will really appreciate the already well-formed style of Tomasz Zawadzinski, who is able to paint musical scenes – “sounds like pictures” – both nostalgic and optimistic, both snowy and warm. The Listener will discover, that She is asked to follow

    Zawadzinski

    not only in one particular direction, but rather in many different ones, towards a great many different worlds...

    Igor Wróblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 1CD


    7,64 EUR