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  • Vanderson | Synthetic Breath

    Vanderson | Synthetic Breath

    Bestseller
    The first time I heard Vanderson was with Visions that I had savoured with incredulous ears. Maciej Wierzchowski gave a splendid musical testimony to the cradle of his influences; the Berlin School. And Synthetic Breath joins in the same vein with 6 compositions which explore the most beautiful years of Klaus Schulze and Tangerine Dream. Excepted for Synthasy, which seems to be a kind of Tangram remix, Synthetic Breath reopens abandoned phases among which the continual appetite of fans for the genre and the perpetual inquisition of the artists influenced by this period demonstrate that the Berlin School style will have the end only when the end will have its own end. The first sequences which drag Synthetic Breath out of its silence seem to be astray from Rubycon while "A Tribute to Tangerine Dream" begins this journey through the creative stages of Berlin School with a sequential movement fed by undisciplined ions. These ions which pound and skip in all directions bring the rhythmic nuances to a fluid rhythm of which the oscillating strength pushes against the apocalyptic breaths of a lunar synth. A great fluty line draws the parts of an unreal melody taken away by the ochred winds which overhang a rhythm with fine permutations and of which the hearing roots are forged in the reminiscences of Ricochet. Electronic chirping form the cosmic dialect of Planet of Visions and its intro which lets itself rock by winds of ether. These winds drew in the fanciful strings of violin are waltzing in a dark oblivion strewed by eclectic breaths and rustles. Sequences forged into tones of xylophone emerge a little after the 4th minute. Other sequences, more twinkling, surround this first rhythmic phase. They dance and waddle for a delicate minimalist harmonious phase which daydreams under stars, calling back these fine sequential movements of Klaus Schulze on Body Love and Mirage. This beautiful sequential movement is of use on Sunrain whose ambient intro displays the floating contrasts of the duet Mergener / Weisser, while the heavy rhythm which ensues from it is subtly switching form to embrace some evolutionary phases with more crystal clear sequences. Light and fluid sequences which cavort on the oniric lands of the Dream with pads tinted of melodic riffs, lyrical solos and fluty breezes.
    After a quite other musical vision of Tangram in Synthasy, Final Sequence borrows again the paths of Klaus Schulze with a great hypnotic movement where sequences are criss-crossing and skipping in their shadows under a rain of very nice solos, bringing us in the bosom of the wonderful analog years from the Berlin School era. Fine sequences of glasses are dancing lightly within the shade of their xylophone strikings, guiding Psychedelic Brunch through its Schulzian influences. A bass line with resonant chords follows the tangent of the sequential movement which offers its heavy and single-phase rhythm to a synth and its superb twisted solos as well as its angelic breaths, pushing the hypnotic ascension up until to the strikings of percussions of which the banging go astray in the breathlessness of Psychedelic Brunch which scatters its last 5 minutes into the plasmatic winds of Synthetic Breath; another great opus of Vanderson who, without reinventing the wheel, draws in his influences to feed again our insatiable appetite for a genre that we wish always inexhaustible.

    Sylvain Lupari - gutsofdarkness.com & synth&sequences.com



    The new Vanderson album opens with a quite good hit: good old Berlin-style sequences come from out of the farthest galaxies, they sound fairly "tangerine" (as if taken from the pretty old single Ultima Thule!) and are full of melotrone-flute sounds, giving a special charm to it - one could ask oneself if it's not an unreleased Sorcerer-session by Tangerine Dream themselves?... Sure one have already heard such textures, but now it's really not important who discovered these sounds - the main thing is, that this moody introduction is just great.
    The second track is a very nice synthesis of traditional electronica and ambient swamps - one could indeed dive and even drown in this music. Here we get a splendid, 12-minute long analogue bath topped with sequential foam - great relax for every true music lover. The third impression may easily be associated with "lurking' soundscapes created by the Ramp-project: it's still sequential electronics in good old style, however, it sounds modern and perfectly mysterious. Sadly, this piece is only 7 minutes long. Piece no. 4 has a box structure, since there is a complicated structure to it hidden behind symmetrical sequential doors. As soon as the rhythm line gets even more nervous and dizzy, we can realize that this composition is Vanderson's "power supply" to the fantastic Virtual Vices-series by Pete Namlook and Wolfram Spyra.
    The fifth piece invites the Listener into the great wide open of misty beatless galaxies that no-one has yet dreamed of. This polar ambient-block is perhaps the best piece in the whole set: now we can travel to the most distant wilderness hidings we have ever thought of...
    The final track is the longest one. Icy arpeggiator movements get a good bounce from the groovy bass line of the leading sequence, and as the track paces along some chord-sighs and improvised solos get on board. We are now taking an uneasy path towards ambiental echoes in the mood of Tangerine Dream's ingenious Phaedra.
    Many electronic music fans have already expressed my feelings: sequential electronics is a well-explored field on which little remains to be yet discovered - and still, from time to time one happens to find a true pearl on this field. This CD by Vanderson is certainly one of such gems - we will find truly magic moments here. It's all about that: sequential electronics is first of all a mixture of moods, colours and landscapes. Vanderson managed to mix all the most important ingredients in his own special way, thus creating an enthralling album that can really be enjoyed.

    Igor Wroblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 1CD


    11,01 EUR
  • Odyssey | Music for Subway - Symphony for Analogues

    Odyssey | Music for Subway - Symphony for Analogues

    Bestseller

    At the time where digital and software synths are invading the studio recordings and basements of EM composers, the analog gear is quietly resurfacing. Sculptor of sound and musical textures, the Polish synthesist

    Tomasz Pauszek

    decided to pay tribute to the cradle of his influences by composing an album completely conceived analog equipments. Music for Subway (Symphony for Analogues) is a long electronic symphony which lies on 20 paintings divided in 2 acts.

    Odyssey

    plunges the auditor into a surprising sound immersion of a musical universe that has no borders and where the cosmic ambiences embrace some fine rhythms pushed by oscillations with sophisticated curves. Even if the influences of Tomasz Pauszek go from

    Tangerine Dream

    to

    Klaus Schulze

    , while passing by

    Mike Oldfield

    and

    Kitaro

    , Music for Subway (Symphony for Analogues) is drawn from

    Jean Michel Jarre's

    electronic-galactic ponds with all the sound fauna of the Milky Ways painted by

    Vangelis

    . In brief, it's an attractive musical cocktail which lets hear all of its magnificence with a good pair of earphones. After the music for airports and for elevators, here is all the new quintessence in analog electronic art; music for subways.
    Like when we are entering in a subway station, Music for Subway (Symphony for Analogues) displays its ambiences with some dense cosmic waves which pass over the passengers and break out through the banisters of Station1 with a hiccupping rhythm which rolls in loop under suave synth harmonies. You think of being in the lands

    Jean Michel Jarre

    ? You are completely right! The rhythmic approach and the harmonies are terribly near the melodies and the film music of the French cinema. The tempo is charmingly old-fashioned and comes close of the underground paces of Space Art with a synth of which the shrillness breezes forge an electronic melody which sings in our ears with a disconcerting fragility. These strident blizzards rush into Station2 such as howling of Martenot waves which float and roam among the colorful jingles of a cosmic streetcar. Throughout his electronic analog symphony,

    Odyssey

    mixes skillfully the rhythms and ambiences with an attractive and creative melodic approach. Station3 is superb with its ghostly rhythm molded the in amplitudes and reverberations which roll in loops under the jingles of cymbals and spectral breaths in an Aeolian oblivion stuffed of an incredible sound fauna which separates the rhythm of its rhythmic envelope. Mainly statics, the movement offers fine variations which modulate Station3 into a long cosmic delirium. Station 4 offers a heavier pace which pulsates with frenzy into a tunnel decorated with ochre smoke and blue electricity. Station 5 is a sweet symphony that could be likened to a dark melody for the Phantom of Tramway with its tones of organs cooing in the shadows of its harmonies. Station 6 offers a beautiful lunar melody which sings under a bed of arpeggios teeming of an intestine life. After a Station 7 akin to Station 1, Station 8 deploys another beautiful melody finely cut in the echo of the synth loops which sings under the fat impulses of a cosmic train rolling into some intergalactic disturbances. The fine melodies moulded into French melancholies are following one another on this first CD which concludes with two serenades to odors of spiritual virginity.
    Disc 2 opens by a threatening approach with layers of organ tones which stack in a cosmic universe, paving the path to the very nice Station 12 and its lively rhythm a'la Oxygene of which the sound effects are papering its background. After the floating and strident Station 13 and Station 14, Station15 gives a fine oscillatory rhythm which undulate among crystalline arpeggios dancing in parallel of a pace which spreads its heavenly harmonies into the structures of Station 16, one of the good tracks from Music for Subway (Symphony for Analogues). This CD 2 is a bit more ambient with short titles more cosmic than rhythmic, like on Station 17 and Station 18 where

    Jarre's

    moods flood our ears with a cosmic poetry which is good to hear again. Even the rhythms are embedded in these dreamy moods, much like the rotary motion of Station 19 which cannot get rid of a linear stranglehold to interstellar ornaments. Station 20 concludes this symphony of analog sonic textures with an abstract pace that some fine celestial harmonies are turning into a role as much obscure as absent.
    We cannot like Music for Subway (Symphony for Analogues) which is an enchanting album build around the influences of an artist who literally propelled the cosmic music out of orbit. One would believe to hear

    Jean Michel Jarre

    in every corner of this latest opus from Odyssey which is a pleasant lunar symphony with a multitude of delicate rhythms which take refuge in the tranquility of the Mare Tranquillitatis. It's superbly beautiful and poetic. One has always this feeling of floating between two worlds which, if they are not to wear feet, are to wear ears.

    Sylvain Lupari - gutsofdarkness.com & synth&sequences.com



    CD1
    Out of the darkness, there comes our subway - now we can join the sound-journey through underground labyrinths. At about the second-minute-mark pure environmental sounds turn into a splendid sequential composition containing many Oxygene - and Equinoxe - like sound effects. Pay attention to the spicy and fantastically produced rhythm-line - well, it really could be a piece conceived by

    Wolfram Spyra

    ...
    This enjoyable introduction flows into the aerodynamic ambience of the second track. Those who are in love with sequential electronica will indeed be fond of the static, cloudy chord accompanying the leading synths. Soon a thunderstorm is coming - with the 3rd minute mark the sweeps and washes of strong wind seem to want to blow the speakers! The third track is an ingenious, nostalgic tale one might associate with

    Electric Light Orchestra's

    Another Heart Breaks - just listen to these echoes and light traces in an endless electronic tunnel! Here we also get a nice Berlin-fashioned solo. Every now and then, one thought comes to mind: it's pretty hard to name the best track in the whole set, since already the very first notes of each impression are truly magic, deep and dreamy in a very special way. Now we may enjoy the fourth piece; what we are dealing with here are mainly "laser-harp" sequences, the whole piece sounds as if it was played on invisible, hard-to-catch neon zigzags. Truly hypnotic, strong ten minutes.
    The next track is somewhat close to the early works of

    Marek Bilinski

    . All important ingredients are there: high-places moods, pitch changes, melodic and yet very original tunes joining each other in electronic cascades. After only three minutes of this amazing mood there appear the polyphonic structures of a sequential concerto for a rainy day. The seventh piece covers suddenly the arpeggios of the former track with majestic chords; soon there joins in a groovy rhythm and a nice solo. The eighth track pulses with a bass - almost "motor-bass" - rhythm sequence; now our wagons slide through tunnel-labyrinths at a tremendous speed and the only thing accompanying our journey is the jarring light of spectacularly stereophonic sequencers! The final piece of the first CD once more conjures up some

    Jean-Michel Jarre

    -like atmospheres, but the nicely chromatic synth-solo and a swooshy percussion line give some new quality to it. As a whole, this piece also reminds the Listener of a marvellous Time-longplay by the

    Electric Light Orchestra

    .

    CD2
    The first track is a majestic tale that is being painted on cold-chord canvas. Not even four minutes have passed and there appear some beats - marking the entrance of the second piece - accompanied with a lively sequential structure, forming an interesting contrast to the quiet chords.
    The third composition is probably the most abstract one in the whole set; among endless dreamy clouds we suddenly see fluorescent sea-horses and match-stroke-chains - or perhaps it's only a cognitive illusion?... How long has this journey already taken, where are we at all? As if awoken from a strange dream, we take an entirely astonished look at our surroundings. Because of the truly "arctic" atmosphere of the fourth piece we can easily imagine that we are entering a numb endless tunnel built from ice and snow - this track is an utmost beautiful 3-minute ambient composition.
    Our fifth station is a polyphonic arpeggiator construction, now and then flashing about with its blue ounces of electric light. As soon as we enter the sixth piece, our wagons begin to move faster and faster, once more through a creepy snow-ice-tunnel, but now everything's filled up with life, everything is moving, flashing, endless lights are being reflected and distorted... Along with the seventh track the wagons slow down, it seems that we have ceased to move forward at all - or perhaps we have just started a motionless dream? Once more we don't have the slightest idea where we are and how long we have been travelling, and still this hasn't a bit of an uneasy feeling to it!
    The eighth track captures us with its fragile crunchy sounds - we are moving through navy-blue pipeline-labyrinths. Thanks to the chilling atmosphere of the ninth piece we may find ourselves in the real world again. With a groovy sequence in the background we begin to recognize faces of all the passengers, there is nothing alien behind the wagon windows, everything sounds earthly again.
    We are leaving on the tenth station. The echo of the corridor amplifies the sound of our footsteps, chilly chords are calling to each other somewhere near, the world awakes, even the first rays of the rising sun are already there, chasing us out of the subway tunnel. The staircase of the mid-tempo sequence carry us out back to the ground level. It has been an amazing journey indeed...

    Igor Wroblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 2CD


    7,98 EUR
  • Przemysław Rudz, Wladysław Komendarek | Unexplored Secrets of REM Sleep

    Przemysław Rudz, Wladysław Komendarek | Unexplored Secrets of REM Sleep

    Bestseller
    The sleep is a fascinating universe. It's a world which belongs to us but of which we don't control the destinies and where we slide quietly towards the semi-comatose phases, there where the beauties cross the horrors and the peace of mind feed the torments. It's inspired by this universe without borders that

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    dipped the tips of his fingers to forge the beginnings of Unexplored Secrets of REM Sleep. Those who are familiar with the works of

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    know what to expect from the brilliant composer and the Polish oasis cosmic sculptor. But that would be the fruit of a collaboration with

    Wladyslaw Komendarek

    ? Keyboardist from vintage psychedelic rock prog band

    Exodus

    and pioneer of the Polish electronic scene since 1985,

    Wladyslaw Komendarek

    is a character so much disproportionate as original who multiplies any sorts of experiments within his musical evolution. Knowing already that the albums of

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    are rich in related tones, what would bring the contribution of

    Komendarek

    ? Built at remotely, Unexplored Secrets of REM Sleep is a brilliant album swarming of bipolar rhythms which depicts with fascination the various phases of sleep. Phases put in music with a superb musical direction, designed by

    Rudz

    , and by stunning cerebral settings, imagined by

    Komendarek

    .
    Standing on the Shoulders of Giants open the doors of dullness with a soft morphic melody prisoner of a vacillating movement of which the contractions slip in a universe of eclectic and electronic tones. Piano notes emerge from this cerebral oblivion, strumming a linear rhythm which is surrounded streaks and solos of a synth which switches around its delicacy for the loudness and bites of a howling guitar. The first steps towards the unexplored secrets of the dreams continue with the title-track and its long intro populated by a collage of musical samplings as much heterogeneous as dreams can weave unsuited landscapes. A galloping sequential movement pierces this veil of indefinite tones, awakening a delicious wave which waddles innocently. After more than 6 minutes of the ghostly knocks or the vague steps, discordant beatings and panting, resounding church bells, moves of spectral waves and electric winds; Unexplored Secrets of REM Sleep gets out of its somnambulistic torpor with a deaf rhythm which amplifies its progression with beautiful élans of keyboards and fluttering synth stratas which caress a wild rhythmic ride fed by the fire of good percussions and boiling psychotronic keyboard keys. Reminiscences From Beyond Infinity is the heart of the sleep's anguishes. It's a long epic title of 24 minutes divided into 4 parts. Divided between its ambient, meditative, rhythmic and furious phases, Reminiscences From Beyond Infinity begins in the tears of

    Dominik Chmurski's

    solitary violin which lulls the morphic choirs of its intro (Atavistic Throwback) with superb tearful stratas. Stratas which cry in a world of apocalyptic metal. The tone is lugubrious and we are absorbed by a world of coldness with knocks of horrible cymbals which crumble the hearing and by the movements of rolling drums which make roar the moon while slowly we slide towards Playing Dice with God. This 2nd part of Reminiscences From Beyond Infinity is filled by rhythms of electronic rock a'la

    Tangerine Dream

    era 220 Volts, guitars less although the impression to hear riffs in there remains vague. The percussions are wild and unbridled. They are supported by stormy sequences of which the crisscrossed exchanges get lost in the knocks of drum while synth solos are powerful and cover this lively rhythm of a strange mood of free-jazz. This rhythm dissolves at about the 11th minute, embracing a more lunar phase. It's a beautiful moment of thoughtful poetry where the synth whistles a delicate lullaby on the back of fine waves to frail undulations. An isolated sequence flutters its rhythmic elytrons, such as a cadenced threat, awakening a vocoder which mumbles the psalms of a schizophrenic misled on the top of a crowned mountain contemplating a world in gestation. It's in this long delirium filled of quirky tones that the last phase of Reminiscences From Beyond Infinity sets in motion. We hear tom-toms resound and the confuse ambiances. Tinkled keys cut the debate between the abstract and the concrete, reviving these synths perfumed by

    Tangerine Dream

    reminiscences of, introducing again a curt and nervous rhythm. A circular rhythm sat over unbridled percussions and sequences which try to fit to this tempo while the synth solos are watering abundantly the rhythmic frenzy with superb audacious musical figures. What a way to end this track!
    After this stormy raid in the bipolar rhythms, Lonely Spirits over the Post-Megalopolis Badland offers a long introduction of serenity. The ambience is very cosmic with h2ly ambient synth layers which float lazily among choirs which breathe the morphic quietness among dusts of stars and notes of a discreet guitar played by

    Jarek Figura

    . The rhythm is boiling slightly a little after the 8th minute. Gyratory, it bends itself on a fusion of pulsations and guitar riffs, being of use as ramparts for sumptuous synth solos which are supported by clouds of choruses. This rhythm is fading away, getting lost in somehow indecisive and a bit spasmodic guitar notes which try to resuscitate a rhythmic phase hidden in the

    Neuronium

    vapours of ethers. Interrupted Stream of Consciousness ends this fascinating essay of the lifelessness universe and its phantasmagorical meanders with fine palpitations which drill an indefinable hubbub and its colourful tones. As everywhere in Unexplored Secrets of REM Sleep the progressive rhythm gets disguise in a sound fauna to thousand hallucinating brightness. The bass of

    Maciek Warda

    molds a groovy tempo which hems under the plaintive spectres of a progressive rhythm and strata of an organ in the old tones of the

    Exodus

    years. And Interrupted Stream of Consciousness explodes of a cosmico-rock-psycho-progressive rhythm with a funky bass, a speaking keyboard, hybrid synth layers and a guitar with furious loops which harmonize their priorities on good percussions, converging on an evolutionary tempo which will break dryly on the cliffs of the incomprehensibility, the dumb witness of the originality and the anarchy of the harmonious fluids which separate Unexplored Secrets of REM Sleep from the dream and its complexities at the evolutionary stage of the sleep, disrupted by such a provocative album.
    You will have guessed that Unexplored Secrets of REM Sleep is not for all ears. It's a powerful album swarming with bipolar rhythms where the disproportionate imagination of

    Wladyslaw Komendarek

    finds his apotheosis in an impressive pattern of sound effects. The music is beautiful. Puzzling, it's split by evolutionary directions which suit h2ly well the conception that we can have of the evolutionary phases of the sleep. In brief, Unexplored Secrets of REM Sleep carries marvellously the boldness of its title and its project. It's an album that we taste at the tips of our ears and once we have both ears filled by, we just can't give up it!

    Sylvain Lupari - gutsofdarkness.com & synth&sequences.com



    One doesn't have to introduce either the el-hero

    Wladyslaw Komendarek

    or the Generator.pl "label"-artist

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    to the fans of sophisticated electronic music. This time we can admire a conjoint of both musicians. Already the title of the work itself announces something very special indeed - well, let's see, what unexplored secrets does the REM phase of sleep hide...
    The first track is built in a warm, folded style, which reminds me of

    Tangerine Dream's

    Flashpoint; one can really enjoy the majestic piano chords and a typically

    Froesean

    guitar in the second part of this piece. In our dream we become watchers of scattered bluesand castles, which disappear slowly and turn ivylike into a concrete wave shimmering with darkened colours.
    Our second dream consists of dismantled waiting for crispy snow, while we are hiding in the shade of a huge metal ice-core-container. The ground is too slippery, we shouldn't take a walk, let's wait for the weather to make its mind - but what is happening on the other side? The whole plain is being searched through by some faint limelights of rusty cranes, which stroll about like hunchbacked mechanical giraffes. The music could be defined as explicit electronic rock, but the first minutes of this track sound as if they were taken from some dusty electronic trail recorded by

    Alex Smoke

    or

    Peter Benisch

    .
    In the third track we will get to know, whether nightshift bulldozers can play the drums; behind their backs we can see the wonders of photosynthesis happening here and now.

    Komendarek

    and

    Rudz

    drift towards daring experimental electro-jazz - they let some new sunlight through the windows of

    Vangelis

    ' Albedo 0.39 in. The fourth dream means slowing down and falling into deep fog. We must hurry up and buy a package of ambient staples before the sequential spiral comes out of its hiding place, somewhere between the solarized beach and abandoned lairs of sea-snakes. The Listener gets lost in the labyrinth of notions, what do all these chalk signs mean. Brilliantly surrealistic 17 minutes.
    The final track can be interpreted as an homage to rock-oriented

    Tangerine Dream

    - it's pretty cool stuff, full of surprising chord-dives into halftones, spicy rhythm line and fairly aggressive guitar tunes. It's hard to tell whether we are observing airports in turmoil or neural interactions, pictures change even faster, when we try to pay attention to their shapes they just disappear like heaps of foam when touched with a piece of soap.
    What we're dealing with here is a very explicit content, a daring odyssey full of daring associations. h2ly recommended.

    Igor Wróblewski



    Przemyslaw Rudz

    quickly became one of CDS Towers best selling indie synth artists over 2011 with a collection of no less than four albums released over the space of a couple of years, and early in 2012 we have a 5th, which this time is a collaboration with somewhat longer standing Polish synth musician

    Wladyslaw Gudonis Komendarek

    . The synth duo also recruited some extra assistance from

    Jarek Figura

    (electric guitar on tracks 4 & 5),

    Dominik Chmurski

    (electric violin on track 3) and

    Maciek Warda

    (bass guitar on track 5).
    Anyone who invested in the previous four

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    albums will like this too. Again, it is an album that breaks some new ground and perfect music to take you out into the many different worlds the mind's eye can offer. Apart from sounding a little like

    Klaus Schulze

    and

    Tangerine Dream

    from time to time, there certainly is nothing overtly familiar that will immediately make you think of other big-name 'EM" musicians. It is very much an album of "original" creations that provide many thrills and spills along the way.
    Many of the classic sounds that sprung up in the earlier

    Rudz

    albums are still well focussed on for this collaborative effort, especially the big space choral sounds that featured on the most recent of his releases. The overall sound is still very much rooted in the classic 70's, with all the added benefits of noughties production techniques, and the end result is an excellent blending of atmospherics, melody and sequencer/rhythmic qualities, with some really classy sound layering and inventive improvisations going on throughout.

    CD Services

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 1CD


    11,01 EUR
  • Vanderson | Visions

    Vanderson | Visions

    Bestseller
    A few thoughtful electronic thuds, some distant sweeps of cosmic wind... Slowly the curtain falls and we may cross the border between this everyday world and that visionary one created by

    Vanderson

    . In the second minute of the opening impression there appears, like a frosty drawing on a window pane, a hypnotic sequence in the good old Berlin style. As time goes by, further instruments join in, the atmosphere gets hot and sticky and yet ethereal... Are we travelling over mountainous roads through some ancient tropical forest, like it was 1977 and we had

    Tangerine Dream's

    Sorcerer-LP spinning on our turntable? The musical piece is wonderfully “gluey” and unreal in a very special numb way, it seems that this music is coming from some unknown dimension. Rainy arpeggios in the second half will awaken the Listener a bit, but they will also supply a load of melancholy.
    The second track is a nicely groovy journey through shining, shimmering desert sands - our footprints have a flutish-sequential shape, whereas the tumbling clouds over our heads sound like

    Jarre

    chords from Oxygene or Equinoxe. The composition has a unique melodic touch to it; the musical feast lasts about 8 minutes, but all the main voices suddenly begin to disappear and dismantle, the only actors left on the stage are electronic subvoices, unformed thoughts, voiceless full-stops... until only silence reigns.
    Slowly awakening murmurs let the Listener know that the third piece has begun. This is the most "Berlinian" impression in the whole playlist, one can hear not only some echoes of

    Tangerine Dream's

    music but also reminiscences of the sounds created by younger cadets of the Berlin School - let's take

    AirSculpture

    , for example, since

    Vanderson's

    frequencies have something in common with their

    Pogofish

    . This 13-minute vision gets complicated and ornamentated, there appears a hypnotic rhythm-line, from the foamy sequences a powerful solo is formed. As if it still was not enough, we will hear amazing mellotron "chorals", so that the pumping sequences may turn into motionless mouldy stones.
    The final track is slower, dreamier, has a deeper shade of ambience. The beginning of this piece is the same deep black electronic water as

    Klaus Schulze's

    Blanche. As time goes by, the mist disappears and a solemn sequence is built - once more with a lot of hypnotic atmosphere to go along with it. A very

    Schulzean

    solo marks the plot point of the composition; the sequence drives higher, there come even more emotions, recollections... It's a pity that 13 minutes and 40 second do pass away so quickly... The piece ends all of a sudden, as if its main sentence hadn't been said to an end... The best thing for the Listener to do is to push the "play" button once again - and drift along, towards some other tale, some other dream, some other vision.

    Vanderson's

    music is visual-rich and visionary indeed.

    Igor Wróblewski



    Vanderson

    is part of this invasion of Polish musicians who embellish the EM scene for the biggest pleasure of our ears. Influenced by Berlin School, both vintage and new,

    Maciej Wierzchowski

    composes a music which oscillates constantly between these two universes, caressing sometimes the cosmic meanders and its tones so metallic as heterogeneous established by

    Jarre

    , at least on Visions, in conformity with what would be completely suited to call today; the Poland School style. Visions is his 7th work and his very first on the label of his native land; Generator Pl. An album which will please undoubtedly the fans of old good Berlin School.
    Sounds of gongs cross the ages, resounding among fine cosmic streaks and its winds which blow to scatter a cosmic silence. Fine sequences drum. Their delicate and feverish palpitations draw the souvenirs of a distant musical world furnished by the art of

    Klaus Schulze

    to modulate silk rhythms. A soft celestial flute covers this fragile poetic tempo which quietly goes towards an atmospheric passage where solitary chords roam among the singings of crickets and threatening reverberations. We are a little after the 6th minute and Vision Part I escapes with sequences which skip with more ardour. Sequences to crisscrossed strikes which intertwine in the doubloons of their hasty succession, moulding these nervous and hypnotic rhythmic which made the delights of vintage Berlin School of the

    Schulze's

    years that

    Maciej Wierzchowski

    sprays with copious synth solos and heterogeneous electronic tones. This rhythm at the same time soft and nervous fed the skeleton of Powerminers which begins with drops falling from a cave walls. Slow synthesized waves sunk into violined stratas are rocking there, waiting for these sequences with a soft chaotic and repetitive pace which team up to fine percussions while the exhilarating minimalist rhythm of Powerminers flows under a thick cloud of cosmic tones and soft flutes which sing under pleasant orchestral arrangements. Very musical, Powerminers ends its lyrical journey in the jingles of an intra-ground station and its trains which fit into each other, a little as in the universe of

    Jean Michel Jarre

    and his Magnetic Fields.
    These tones of trains continue beyond Vision Part II whose rhythm is drummed by sequences to arrhythmic pulsations which spawn in the shade of discreet reverberations. Clouds of mist cover this rhythm which accelerates subtly its pace, while cymbals and percussions are framing a soft semi frenzied ascent which binds itself in percussions to tones of anvils wrapped in wadding to burst in a heavy and boosted ambiance. A very electronic ambiance filled by fragrances of

    Tangerine Dream

    and

    Air Sculpture

    with furious synth solos. The intro of Vision Part III reminds me a lot of the essays of

    Adelbert Von Deyen

    on his very beautiful Atmospheres (1980). The mood is as well poetic as cosmic with its clouds of spatial dusts which enfold the warm winds of lyrical synths. This is superb vintage years cosmic Berlin School we are hearing here with all this panoply of analog electronic tones which become entangled in a perfect atmospheric symbiosis. We feel a life inside these organic instabilities which implode of an oniric slowness, waiting for the smallest space of freedom to explode of a progressive rhythm. And the opening occurs a little before the 5th minute with sequences which alternate in a perfect symmetry, drawing a rhythm limping on cyclic and crisscrossed chords which waddle by following the movement of a more harmonious synth line. This hypnotic rhythm set by carillons and reverberations hangs on to wonderful solos which enlace and coil on a minimalist tangent a bit evolutive.
    I adored

    Vanderson's

    Visions. It's a splendid return in time when vintage Berlin School had this capacity to seduce with its soft minimalist sequences which fed long hypnotic movements where the modifications in structures were as perceptible as a blinking of lash. Evolutive rhythms which were of use as assizes to long and languishing synth solos or musical canvas to atmospheric sound paintings where the imagination rocked our dreams and transcends our fantasies. It's very beautiful and too short! And this gives me the taste to go off to explore the world of

    Vanderson

    .

    Sylvain Lupari gutsofdarkness.com & synth&sequences.com



    If I’m not mistaken, Visions is the very first factory-pressed cd by Polish composer

    Vanderson

    , aka

    Maciej Wierzchowski

    . This cosmic album pairs the classic sound of Germany's vintage EM-years with nowadays modern technology, all assembled into four long compositions.
    Next to most enjoyable spatial sequencing following in the footsteps of

    Schulze

    and

    Tangerine Dream

    ,

    Vanderson

    knows the right tricks by presenting s a nice range of spacious pads and solo voices along catchy effects and environmental sonic sketches. The latter neatly expands the sonic experience brought to you on the second piece Powerminers.
    The first part of the title track roams in moody atmospherics, while the second part is much more up-tempo and smoothly moving along with a joyous solo. I personally imagine though the title track’s third part will be the favourite amongst fans of melodic EM. This 13-minute composition perfectly compliments the general melodic output of German E-bands and musicians we’ve accustomed to in the last decade or so.
    Despite sounding far from original, I'm most confident the 45-minute Visions will easily find its way to the main EM fan base.

    Bert Strolenberg



    Now, this really IS a nice "Berlin School" style release! Featuring four long tracks, all filled with the classic elements of the genre - lush, flowing space & string synth textures and soaring melodies, all set over sequenced rhythmic bases that really do groove!

    Vanderson

    is new Polish electronic musician

    Maciej Wierzchowski

    , and if this debut release is anything to go by, we have found ourselves a really excellent new musician playing in the "Berlin School" style.
    Visions - 1 starts out in a dark, atmospheric territory and after a couple of minutes a sequenced rhythm flows in on soft waves of cosmic synths, then a Mellotron flute sound follows down the path with a heavenly melodic lead and flows oh so effortlessly through the remainder of the track, building extra layers and textures as it goes, before finally closing to the sounds of effects and metallic synthesizers.
    Powerminers fades in with cavernous keyboards and

    Jarre

    -like phased, swooshing space synths that sway gracefully from side to side of the stereo image, until a central metallic sequencer rolls in from centre stage, closely followed by more wispy and extremely tuneful Mellotron flute sounds which take the lead until the final two minutes where the music fades to reveal the clacking sounds of what sounds like a slowly moving goods train. This effect transports us towards Visions - Part 2 where a deep threatening synth texture lies behind the sounds of the slowly moving train as it gradually clunks off into the distance. A fast beating sequencer riff rises from the horizon and gets into a real flowing groove, and at just over two minutes in, phased swirling synths provide a beautifully controlled backdrop for the rhythms to accelerate over. More cavernous synth effects appear at various points and the lead space/string synths get into a really gorgeous cosmic groove with distant Mellotron flutes hidden deep in the mix. Just before the halfway mark a fantastic lead synthesizer emerges with a magnificent improvised melody line that just moves everything up a few levels on the excitement scale as it rolls high and low over the soundstage. Everything starts to decelerate for the final two minutes, where a distant Mellotron choir envelops you into a heavenly cumulous cloud of cosmic magnificence. An early seventies

    Schulze

    -like organ sound surrounded by a host of sweeping space synths opens Visions 3 to magnificent effect. After meandering in space for four sumptuous minutes a sequencer rhythm that seems to have derived from an electric piano sound comes in to great effect to join the swathes of cosmic sounds and at just after the six minute mark up jumps an anthemic lead synth line that again lifts the whole track up into the heavens on a flight of real melodic worth. With some magnificent key changes adding to the thrilling nature of the passage, Maciej improvises the melody line and brings the track towards a climax, where another quick key change prompts the start of the climb down to just the sounds of the driving sequencer force and phased synth textures that take the track towards it's natural conclusion.
    Overall, a magnificent, top-notch "Berlin School" album that is as good as any I have heard in the genre for some time. Incorporating flowing grooves with fantastic atmospherics, with just the right amount of melodic leads and key changes, this album will keep you rooted to the trip from start to finish.

    CD Services

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 1CD


    11,01 EUR
  • Przemysław Rudź | Cerulean Legacy

    Przemysław Rudź | Cerulean Legacy

    Bestseller

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    is one of the finest new artists to emerge from the EM scene since a couple of years. Strongly inspired by sci-fi and the music of

    Jean Michel Jarre

    , the Polish synthesist builds albums in the measure of his visions with a skilful mixture of rhythms, sound effects, samplings and atmospheres. Cased in nice artworks that depicts the ideals and minks without ambiguities,

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    ' works soak into pure energetic cosmic rock. Cerulean Legacy is the cry of an artist so that our descendants have the right to aspire to a better world, a world of azure where it would be good to live in it, as the one our ancestors built. Farewell to Tranquil Existence opens this 4th

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    work with a long and sinuous synth wave. Soon, other waves are adding. Graver and more resounding they float and get entangled become with variable tones in a long musical cortex where they waltz and float casually in search of a sequence, a rhythm. Little after the 7th minute a discreet guitar riff appears. This riff rubs an abstracted rhythm behind a maelstrom of synth layers agglutinating in a cosmos filled of very Jarrian tones. This riff tumbles in loops, being astride a persistent plasticized electronic where joyful and shrill human voices are out of tune among twisted and sharp synth solos which try to tear this opaque veil that is the sound barrier of Farewell to Tranquil Existence. With its rhythms and sudden outcomes Mystery of ALH 84001 is the craziest track of Cerulean Legacy. It starts with a very eclectic intro where fine tinkled arpeggios wind and glean among very heterogeneous tones, not to say very extra - terrestrials vocalizes. A fine hatched sequence emerges out of this glass magma to dance of a hesitating movement. It circulates in limpid circles and scatters the glasses ringing whereas a warm synth veil wraps up Mystery of ALH 84001. A thick fog settles down, imprisoning Cerulean Legacy's longest track into an inertia where circulates and embraces a thick cloud of morphic stratums. Another sequence appears. This time it cackles such as a galactic duck while a drum shakes it skins with hardihood to shaped a rebel and chaotic rhythmic which draws the bedazzled rhythm of Mystery of ALH 84001. Solos and synth layers bite this wild rhythm, as a cosmic free-jazz, while percussions are isolating to hammer an unexpected solo. The beatings fall with a robotics precision while a low sequence with resonant chords encircles this solo to mould a syncopated tempo which hiccups beneath nice synth pads and cherubs' shouts lost in a notion of the time that only

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    seems to overpower. A little as Farewell to Tranquil Existence, Of Gaia Prophetic Dream floats in a cosmos filled by caustic and slinky synth stratums. Notes of guitar are dawdling there. Wandering and solitary, they chatter with the chirping of quixotic birds which sing in the shade of a synth from which sclerosed layers and metallic stratums roar under droning pulsations.
    Two Days After Extinction begins with a beautiful cosmic choir which extends beyond the first notes of a lonely piano. A beautiful and soft intro where we feel all the gloom and the melancholy of 2 days which follow some disaster. The piano there is superb. Notes are strummed with the sadness of a pianist forgotten in a night-bar where some metallic clamours can be heard. We navigate between several parallel musical worlds. I'm hearing there some influences of

    Schulze

    and

    Schmoelling

    , as well as

    Stearns

    and

    Mondshine

    on a slow movement which smells distress, a little as in the universe of Blade Runner. And this illusion takes all its sense with languishing synth solos that tear the opaqueness of sadness beneath fine mellotron mists. At around the 5th minute spot, a heavy sequential movement shakes the apathy of funeral laments, there where voices continued to murmur their sadness in the shade metallic crows croaks. It's a short sequential movement which serves as rhythmic link between Two Days After Extinction and the lively The Power of Mind. The bewildered rhythm of a jerky and stroboscopic sequential movement gets moulding to those psychotronic beatings of Mystery of ALH 84001and to a hiccupping bass line in order to forged a wrecking rhythm where the heavy techno'd approach marine very well with a crazy free-jazz. The Power of Mind is wild and fed by the beatings of a curt and incisive drum whereas synths wave and stroll without too much instigation on an unbridled rhythm. A rhythm which quietly goes astray towards a more cosmic tangent beneath the story of a fragment of speech held by Stephen Hawking in Mars 2002. Still there, we feel the strong influence of a

    Jarre

    with synth layers there which are waving and embracing with sonorities from En Attendant Cousteau.
    Surprising, mesmerizing and puzzling are the first qualifiers that come in mind to describe this last musical odyssey of

    Przemyslaw Rudz

    . Cerulean Legacy is an opus just like its title. A powerful album where the blue-sky tears two universes of which the parallelism is next to a kind of improbability and where the soft ambient and morphic music caresses wild and ambiguous rhythms. Navigating between the complexities of a musical world to sinuous atmospheres and rich in composite tones as well as in rhythms at once explosive and reserved, Cerulean Legacy is this kind of story to be listened to with all the attention which deserves its conception.
    Sylvain Lupari - gutsofdarkness.com & synth&sequences.com



    5 tracks, almost 69 minutes. The whole adventure starts off on a vast airport on a beautiful sunny day. What we are hearing is one column of a chord - and still there is so much happening around: some thoughts take off, some other are landing... Everything is subtly muted with a flanger-deck, sunshine is every now and then blended with clouds - memories intermingle with reality, and then a giant airplane arrives and moves through the heathaze. Around 7:00 there appears a punctuated sequence, somewhere in the background there is still plenty of moving thoughts and memories. In the ninth minute some voice and laughter samples are added into the mix and the lead synth sounds a bit like on

    Vangelis

    records from the early seventies. With the 12. minute the music fades out. The second track is a suite of over 20 minutes. Some mystical silent sounds are to be heard: bells, subtle rattling, followed by a whole bunch of electronic flashings and tiny flickering lights. The patterns become more complex, the whole piece of music has new boundaries and new shapes. Around 3:00 new chords are introduced, floating about in the rattling musical stream. Very good meditation music indeed; stagnative yet ceaselessly changing. After the first five minutes the proportions have changed, the chords are now louder than the colourful pattern stream. Before we arrive at 7:00 the "stream" becomes silent and gigantic chord cloudscapes are left alone on stage. A leading melody is formed, quite in the Oxygene mood, especially when the chords get itched with icy needles coming from behind the clouds. Later there appears a percussion line, the ostinato melody changes, and in the 17. minute of the track we can witness the birth of a human child a cyborg? a fairy? yet another creature?
    Track three brings static chords, once again under a flanger-deck, and some aerodynamic floatations. The wall of sound is every now and then loaded with a sitar-like hiss - East meets West. The atmosphere is conjured up with quite few sound levels, once again we have to admit that

    Rudz

    has really brilliant ideas how to create fascinating sounds. Thanks to the overall guitar softness and slightly oriental taste this piece of music reminds me of Popol Vuh's Aguirre, nonetheless served in a very special, individual way. The sound spins in a psychedelic circle, we are quite near to spacey moods a'la Move D vs.

    Namlook

    ... It's a pity that after seven minutes the music is suddenly gone.
    Track four is opened with static humming of an electronic choir, once again one has to think about Popol Vuh and their Aguirre - there's plenty of room, the fresh scent of vast meadows is really tempting. At about 5:00 gentle piano sounds can be heard, with a crystal touch a'la

    Detlef Keller's

    The Story of the Clouds to it. On the other hand, one might associate the mood of this track with the most melodic passages of

    Klaus Schulze's

    Esoteric Goody. A thoughtful solo gets onto the gigantic choral tree. In the 14. minute crows soar above our heads - could it be a reminiscence of Pink Floyd's Echoes?... The crystal-clear song of the piano sounds fantastic with the apeironic vibrating meadow choir as a background - well, without any doubt it is my favourite piece in the whole set. And there is still more to it – as soon as we think, that the time is up and the track comes to an end, some nice bass thuds are added and as if from a long forgotten cave there appear waves of sequential smoke. Unfortunately, as we are waiting for yet another movement, yet another change, the music suddenly is gone, the track fades out into the last piece of the album. This one is rather lively, thanks to a percussion line and a rhythmically trembling melody - a nice crossover try between traditional electronica, elpop and electro. Quite in

    Spyra's

    mood -

    Rudź

    confronts us with his own vision in a similar style. Nice sighing chords wander around, and on top of that a lecture on Stephen Hawking's physics is to be heard. Oxygene-like cloudscapes recur... We cannot believe that we are still in the same world, in which we pushed the "play"-button, and not in a parallel universe created by the artist. Congratulations,

    Przemysław Rudź

    , it's your best album so far!

    Igor Wróblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 1CD


    11,01 EUR
  • Noryani | Northeast 117

    Noryani | Northeast 117

    Bestseller Good price
    A little gift from Poland,

    Noryani

    doesn't really consider himself as an artist but rather as a music creator. We must listen to it before agreeing to such a statement! Because the Polish synthesist, or sound sculptor, has a superb talent to create a melodious music which dives into rhythmic storms as dynamic as varied and unexpected. Northeast 117 is his first album. A nice one carefully thought through which presents 9 tracks all so melodious one from the others which soak into cadences and sequences in continual permutations. Suave, synths are vaporous with nice orchestrations which are not without reminding the silky angelic world of Vangelis more exactly in the periods of Direct to Voices, while passing by Blade Runner.
    A fine sequential carousel with sonority of a limpid circular harp opens the first measures of Destinations-Northeast. A synth puts down light pads of mist whereas the carousel waves with more insistence. Some percussions to hybrid tones frame the pace which beats beneath arrhythmic pulsations, wrapped by suave synth solos with a scent of saxophone. The rhythm slightly more accentuated and a more fed structure, Destinations-Northeast evolves towards a sequential whirlwind where notes of a quixotic harp sway on a pounding rhythm and synths to symphonic breezes. After a noisy metallic click Monumentos (El Primer Círculo) offers a soft movement of melodious synth which multiplies its harmonious layers such as a

    Vangelis

    soundtrack. The movement is smooth and bended on a fine sequence which softly waves, dragging Monumentos (El Primer Círculo) towards a very nice synth lament. It's a very nice track where the hair skin raises quite as the spine so much the resemblance with

    Vangelis

    is striking, in particular with Monumentos (El Segundo Círculo) and its dramatic structure to Middle East fragrances fed by beautiful orchestral arrangements, good beatings of symphonic percussions and synth filled with suave stratums and dark choruses. Aroma de las Naranjas pursues this musical quest very near

    Vangelis'

    soils with a heavy and atonal track which spins of its heavy metallic synth stratums. If the first phase mixes choirs synths layers to reverberating curves, the second phase livens up of a fine line of percussion which skips nervously, but subtly, beneath a symphonic synth duped of heavy rippling stratums. The tempo becomes more precise at the end of the road with keyboards and piano keys which dance on a more lively structure where hoarse metallic breezes are fitting on a slightly syncopated sequence.
    Canela is another beautiful track that shows all the sound work created by

    Noryani

    on Northeast 117. A track which shows several unexpected developments and which subjugates by the beauty of its approach a bit jazzy. Movements of rail trains unfasten the intro. They stop there, where a sulphurous synth to saxophone solos glean on a rhythm which settles down. Sensual, Canela opens a hybrid sequential movement where sequenced chords pulse and are subdivided into balanced chords and others which take the shape of industrial jingles that we heard almost everywhere on Northeast 117. Subtly the tempo deviates towards a tribal approach. But it's a short detour before it takes back its cruising speed with a surprising hybrid sequential movement which charms beneath the breezes of a wandering saxophone. Caramelo moves on with a short ambient intro fed by a multitude of eclectic tones. Percussions fall and mould a jerky rhythm that a good line of bass embellishes with its hopping notes. Synths are always as vaporous as harmonious and sing on a rhythmic structure struck by good percussions with anvil sounds and encircled by a light syncopated movement. New from far Away is a strange ballad. Strange because beautiful with its tearful synth which draws an approach of a solitary cowboy and by those percussions which tumble to mould an indefinite rhythm that winces more than it moves. It's a nice track that, like most of the tracks on Northeast 117, suffers of a kind of musical bipolarity because it always eventually bursts of a still rhythm on a soft fluty synth. Solid State (Interpolar) is a blend of techno and very energetic free-jazz with its pulsating percussions and its warmth synth lines. It's a real knocker! Re-Set encloses this first opus of

    Noryani

    with a superb melodious approach hunted and torpedoed by a solid syncopated rhythm. Delicate notes of an acoustic guitar are pinched with firmness and plot a soft melancholy which drags its sadness on a mellotron cloud. Threatening reverberations break this ethereal melodious combination, opening the door to percussions which strike shyly the pace on a finely jerky sequential line. Quietly Re-Set dresses itself with a range of composite tones, before biting the rhythm on a jerked sequence which explodes in a fiery movement of a very schizophonic techno. It is the proof by nine that Northeast 117 is feeding on unpredictable rhythms and musical styles more than varied on structures initially very melodious. Here is a nice album of a beautiful musicality that one listens to as we breathe the freshness of the wind and where

    Noryani

    is as well enigmatic as very promising.

    Sylvain Lupari - gutsofdarkness.com & synth&sequences.com



    We take a sequential trip as soon as the first piece begins. As far as famous synthesizer artists are concerned, there come

    BIOnighT

    and

    Paul Nagle

    to one's mind - here it is, a lonely snowy park, somewhere far away car- and neon-lights are shimmering, and this very place lives a life of its own, caught with a hidden synthesizer-oriented camera... The second piece is quite rapturous, optimistic; such mid-tempo pace and "sunrainy" melodies are normally associated with musicians collaborating with the Neu Harmony label.
    The shape of the third piece is marked by silence and pauses as well as by lurking sequential passages and some catchy tunes a'la

    Vangelis

    (let's pay attention to the arrangements - doesn't it all sound a bit as if it was Blade Runner's twin?... The fourth track is based on penetrative dark beams, whereby a kettle full of black ambient mass is boiling. This would be an ingenious intro, and behold, it turns out to be a whole piece of music! Apart from that, there appear some nice bassline sighs in the background - until now it's my favourite piece of the set.
    Track five... Long shadowy sounds flow through space a bit as if it was some early

    Vangelis

    record, and the main melody is here the jewel in the crown - a gramophone recollection, a leaf found near the puddle in the park whose specific form reminds us of something nice, warm and long forgotten. Such is the atmosphere of this piece of music, yet another one among my favourites. The sweepy percussion line could also be a work by

    Spyra

    , another master of nostalgia with a bit of humor to it. The sixth piece illustrates the question "What is time?" quite well. There they go, sombre and melancholic chords, accompanied by some murky background-sounds and an elegant trance percussion line. This one is a very nice melange of elpop and chilly electro in a navyblue-silvery organic mood. Track seven brings some windy keyboards, while an electronic sandstorm is approaching. An interesting way to serve electronic romanticism and a good deal of suspense. In the eighth composition a catchy sequential "riff" appears, reminding me of the atmosphere of non-hit tracks from Peter Gabriel's So. Here we have nice "singing" drum patterns and a pleasant recurring melody. The sequencer joins in and, after two minutes from the start, a trance beat-line. Now there is pretty much going on at all levels, static keyboard soundscapes get mixed nicely with percussive dynamics. At dawn we take a look through the window and see all the buildings and cars as if in a deformed negative photo - as if it were the same as usual, and still, what an enthralling surprise! Track nine is the final word. Soft guitar sounds as if from some other dimension, wax dawn mantra; through the window we catch a glimpse of the snowy park from the opening track. The street lamps fade out, night turns into bent cold dawn, we cannot be sure if it is a black garbage bag or a raven preparing to fly away, there, behind the bench, in this gloomy aura... Such a beautiful piece of music to wake up with, an introduction to yet another snowy, frosty day. A track I could compare this one with is Thomas P. Heckmann's fantastic Astral Chains. Strongly recommended.

    Igor Wróblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 1CD


    7,64 EUR
  • Przemysław Rudź | Self-Replicating Intelligent Spawn

    Przemysław Rudź | Self-Replicating Intelligent Spawn

    Bestseller

    Sunny side up - welcome to the bright side of piano lounge, open the window immediately, breathe in these slightly tangerine notes (soon there appear some subtle autumn electronics in the background). After such an introduction, track two, a 13-minute long journey through firing cells and moaning electronic choir-tunnels is quite a surprise indeed. Still, the classic electronica touch is present here, mainly in the second part of this piece. This composition is an amazing abstract illustration, which every Listener may interpret in her own special way. As soon as track three slides in, get ready to greet - or fight - loud cyberinvaders, who definitely enjoy good melodies (this track reminds me of Mike Oldfield or... Laser Dance, but mind you, I mean it in a positive sense). After this short interlude we change the overall mood once more. This time we can surf on lounge-pop waves towards the horizon of amassed snowy clouds and electrifying keyboard solos. It's quite a thrill for all those of you, who like the typical sound of the Neu Harmony label and its eclectic conjoint of sequential tradition and 'lite electronica': this track has its charm and groove, and that's why I'd like to dub it the 'greatest hit' featured on this CD. What we are dealing with here, is ambitious music, so it's no wonder that our 'hit' is ca. 10 minutes long... Still, my favourite moment so far is this splendid introduction to track five, built over an unbelievably catchy tune, which sounds as if it were played on 'electronic lute'. The music gets faster and louder, the whole turns out to be a pretty cool sample of 'electronic rock according to Przemyslaw Rudz'. The lute-motiv comes back, this time it sounds yet fuller and sappier, probably because of the additional percussive workout accompanying it. And yet another surprise - the most powerful keyboard solo of the album! Nevertheless, it seems that all these tracks are an overture to the opus magnum, a 24-minute long odyssey, in which Rudz mixes fairytale-ambience a la Kitaro, sequential electronica and eclectic sounds reminding of Asana's Shrine. On top of it - famous words by Neil Armstrong. The last track is a nice walk along the edge of a beach, you can hear birds soaring, and I could swear that I also heard, due to Rudz's synthesizers, the setting sun calming the afternoon water. Przemyslaw Rudz has as usual done a good job of taking the Listener on a surprising journey. On this journey one has an impression that the music does not ooze from the speakers, but comes from within the Listener, perfectly accompanying her thoughts and feelings.

    Igor Wróblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 1CD


    11,01 EUR
  • Odyssey, Remote Spaces | Ypsilon Project

    Odyssey, Remote Spaces | Ypsilon Project

    Bestseller Good price

    Ypsilon Project is born out of a studio session held in

    Odyssey's

    studio on September 2002 with

    Remote Space

    . Together they melted their influences and styles in a musical union which joined the recollections of the 80's. Making it

    Tomasz Pauszek

    ,

    Konrad Jakrzewski

    and

    Krysztof Rzeznicki

    signed an album with rhythms as varied as styles. From

    Kraftwerk

    to

    Jean Michel Jarre

    en passing by

    Robert Schroeder

    and

    Double Fantasy

    , Ypsilon Project is the meeting point of a period of transition in EM.
    A threadlike cosmic furrow comes down from the deep end of the galaxy to cross its harmonies with a splendid guitar that a synth molds poignant heart-rending solos. A very beautiful smoothing track, In-Thro-Duction introduces us to Ypsilon with an astral tenderness where our dreams float on guitar solos which go adrift in a cosmos filled with stars and celestial bodies which furrow and shine with their musical irradiations. Sequence Space is shaming us out of our soft morphic torpor with fine droplets falling trough their echoes. A suave and warm rhythm is settling down and livens up Sequence Space which moves like a down tempo, but more spatial with beautiful electronic tonalities which wrap a pace becoming more caustic. A soft moon-tempo anchored on a sequential line with delicate pulsations of bass of which notes skip among sequences and more fluid keyboard keys. A track strongly tinted of cosmic fragrances and which reminds me

    Double Fantasy's

    musical universe, Sequence Space is flied over by beautiful twisted synth solos and nice mellotron mist. Percussions pound the opening of Busy City, a track that could easily compares to

    Kraftwerk

    techno style. The rhythm is crystal clear and unfolds pleasantly on jerky synth layers of which the repetition molds a still surge. A strong electro techno track, Busy City unravels its 8 minutes with a steady rhythm and a pulsating frenzy where a variance in the percussions and frenzied pulsations assures a rhythmic which kicks down the shed on a long movement of which the melodious approach varies without ever losing its very electronic cachet, quite as the boiling and furious Morning Rush which is more contemporary and who soaks in an array of heterogeneous electronic tones. Ypsilon's intro is melting with the finale of Morning Rush and offers a more suave tempo, with fine subtleties in the movement, a little as on Sequence Space but with more firmness in the beat.
    Experience sticks Ypsilon with crystalline arpeggios which collide on a sequence to resonant undulations. While we expect an explosive rhythm, Experience takes quite another form with a heavy rhythm certainly, but imprinted by a nice musicality. A kind of techno based on minimalism arpeggios which roll on dichotomous percussions and of which all the rhythm aspect is wrapped with dense synths layers. Synths which sing and charm while freeing nice warbling solos. It's one of the very good track on Ypsilon. With Ambiente we approach the ambient part of Ypsilon. A complex track segmented in several movements, the intro is a slow cosmic waltz where synths strata are multiplying by borrowing contrasting sonorities on a slender sidewinder sounds structure. Abrasive strata which are melting themselves on others with more cocoon-like sounding to form a strange lunar dance and which borrow a superb musical corridor where soft mesmerizing percussions light an odd hypnotic tempo. A real electronic dance which is not without recalling the caustic universes of the first

    Schulze's

    works, Ambiente evolves with such unpredictability as every development charms the listener. A wonderful track with synths as wheedling as charismatic which feed an outstanding lunar procession that sidewinder sounds effects come, here and there, to add more strangeness to this sublime track. It's a real one for real fans of evolutive ambient EM. Halfway between the ambient sweetness of Ambiente and the shy rhythms of Sequence Space, Current Drive evolves on a slow, but constant, rhythmic progression where percussions play a dominating role in its hybrid structure. The more Current Drive moves on the more its tempo espouses a tribal approach with a jerky rhythm where percussions shape a kind of aboriginal tom-toms coming of an unknown planet, whereas keyboards polish a fascinating outer space melody and that synths wrap the structure of long resonant and twisted strips. Current Drive is yet another very strong track on Ypsilon where styles are leaking away in the creative originality of the Polish trio. Acti-Vate concludes on a hectic rhythmic which dances on beautiful synth surges. It's a kind of techno a'la

    Kraftwerk

    way that shows the extreme diversity of

    Tomasz Pauszek

    ,

    Konrad Jakrzewski

    and

    Krysztof Rzeznicki

    .
    Curt and frenzied rhythms, other more suave and hypnotic, which go alongside to some ambient and morphic structures variety of Ypsilon is its biggest wealth. Ypsilon is this kind of album where the musicality and variety can reach and please a wider audience without sacrificing the musical research.
    It's a very nice album that can easily split two styles in the same desire to tame music and so to bring down many presumptuous barriers.

    Sylvain Lupari gutsofdarkness.com & synth&sequences.com



    The music on this album is made by

    Tomasz Pauszek

    (aka

    Odyssey

    ) and the duo

    Konrad Jakrzewski

    &

    Krysztof Rzeznicki

    (aka

    Remote Spaces

    ), of which I heard more years in the previous years. The outcome which makes up Ypsilon Project was composed during live sessions by the three musicians in September 2002. The 76-minutes of music has a vibrant and warm flavour. Its overall atmosphere more or less hails back to the electronic music made at the start of the '80’s when technology slowly but surely stepped in bit by bit. Just have a listen to the smooth and relaxed mood created on the 12-minute Sequence Space, followed by the dynamic electronic rock-pop and up-tempo sequencing of Busy City to get a picture of what the albums music is all about.
    All in all, Ypsilon Project is somewhat of a cross-over of

    Jarre

    ,

    Kraftwerk

    and even

    Tangerine Dream

    .
    Nicely done, guys!

    Bert Strolenberg sonicimmersion.org



    The journey begins somewhat in the mood of a radio-program a'la Radioactivity by

    Kraftwerk

    , soon there appear optimistic notes played on a slightly distorted guitar (or conjured up from a synthesizer?), and, after a while, some boiling chord-clouds fade out and the Listener is home alone with a mere ostinato in a slow pace, which marks the beginning of track two. Are we just taking a long walk through a japanese garden-labyrinth, are these slowly falling white spots snowflakes or tiny flowers? This quiet impression definitely has something to it which reminds me of the music presented by

    Double Fantasy

    (today:

    Food 4 Fantasy

    ) on their album Universal Avenue; the same organic cleanness, which one may associate with empty cosmic space as well as with familiar earthly landscapes. This piece of music is 12 minutes of a solid lounge-trip into the exotic Unknown. Track three is quite a contrast to its predecessor: you immediately hear neonlights, city lights, vehicle lights and neverending car-loops. Welcome to the most modern city at steelgray dawn or in the navyblue evening... In track four, it sounds like

    Harald Grosskopf

    or the

    Kraftwerk

    musicians from the Tour de France Soundtracks era were invited to the session - this is what one should call "aerodynamic music". We are here just a step away not only from sequential electronica or "jarre'ing" elpop, but also from modern remixing moods. In the quicksilver-lively fifth track we hear a solo sounding exactly as if it were conceived on PPG Wave 2 – warm regards from

    Jarre

    or

    Double Fantasy

    (or

    Paul Nagle's

    Lore)! The most traditional piece is probably track six, where

    Odyssey

    vs.

    Remote Spaces

    combine Berlin-like sequences and some JMJ-like moods. The Listener may now enjoy digital clouds approaching just a few inches above her head, the clouds change their forms and colours ceaselessly... The next two pieces are fairly long, more complex, more difficult to classify. Various styles intermingle with each other, the arrangements seem to have been taken out of an electronic dream vault. Both compositions could be musical narrations about snowy parks at night – the first short novel is rather nostalgic, the other one rather murky - pay attention to this ingenuous tabla-loop in the background of track eight! As we all know, all good things move toward their end, and there it is - the final track, groovy elpop slightly in the mood of (once more)

    Double Fantasy

    or

    Jarre

    , but also

    Marek Bilinski

    or

    Tangerine Dream's

    film music in the eighties. In this track we hear a fresh breeze of ostinato-vocoderian "retro-sounds". All in all, Ypsilon Project is a well-produced, multilayered album, which contains 'many happy returns' to legendary electronic moods as well as some surprising arrangements and new formal ideas.

    Igor Wróblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 1CD


    7,64 EUR
  • Aairria | Urbanisation

    Aairria | Urbanisation

    Bestseller Good price

    Recurring waves of slow, glowing ambience, then first rhythmic accents appear, and then a calm ostinato, a bit similar to theeclectic ones conjured up by the Asana-musicians... this is how the album begins. The musical journey will get more surprising with each step. The Listener may enjoy visiting growing cities, as if taken from a strange geometrical dream. Elements of quite original sequential electronica intermingle with click-ambient and even environmental!... Yes indeed, some passages included here recall a daring version of Vangelis' The City pure environmental cityscape-soundtracks, and yet there's far more from Charles Uzzell-Edwards than Vangelis here (!!!) - see, for example, civilization-sounds-bridge leading from the first composition on the album to the following one. The first 27 minutes of the CD is not only a good portion of ingenious background music; each further listening makes the Listener feel better in the bubbling ambient bath, abstract and yet very urban indeed. The third impression is a bit more compressed and contains a more rhythmic part, still, this music is very fresh and hard to classify; pay attention to fantastic twists, scratches and metallic sweeps a la Atom TM. Well, this is probably the most "faxy" album released in the Generator.pl label... but don't worry, all you traditional-electronica-lovers out there, the fourth track provides you with a sequence which really does sound as if it were a "Frankfurt rework" of Magnetic Fields, Part III by Jean-Michel Jarre... But, all in all, even here the music flows and glows in a nicely abstract way in an organic cloud of fascinating, ever-changing city voices. The final track reminded me of some great click-ambient productions from the StadtGruenLabel, as well as of Hazard's Land and "urban installations" by Tetsu Inoue. Here we have a portion of patterns known from the first half of the album, but they appear in an entirely different context with a little help of low-vibrating, meditative chords. Urbanisation is a wonderful, very "holographic" album, there are plenty of dimensions and environmental questionmarks here; the music presented by Aairria is not only a perfect background illustration, but also a delicious main dish for each ambient-cookbook-enthusiast. Strongly recommended.

    Igor Wróblewski

    Availability: Goods in stock | product: 1CD


    7,64 EUR